Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 18 total)
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  • Avatarjayd10033
    Participant
    Post count: 23

    Hello Doctor,

    I am 4 weeks post-op (previous posts have described progress thus far) and am experiencing severe, limiting back pain – which I believe is a muscle spasm but not sure. This is new as of a few days ago. Sitting down, getting up from a chair, rolling over in bed, really anything except laying down, kicks it off. The pain is often so great I cannot stand but have to remain sitting until it subsides and try again more slowly, with a different angle, more bending at the hips, etc.

    This is not pain at the surgical site, not radiating to any limbs, just lower back.

    Is this part of healing? Is it from not moving the lower back for 4 weeks? I’ve never experienced low back pain like this, even before surgery. Hoping it’s just muscles and not more nerve stuff.

    I had a post op MRI today and will await the results. But since the only place I am in any comfort is on my back, I thought I’d ask the forum.

    Currently taking Naproxen + tizanidine.

    Thank you,
    Jay

    • This topic was modified 3 weeks ago by Avatarjayd10033.
    AvatarDonald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 7982

    Back pain that feels like muscle spasms and is quite impairing could be from post-surgery pain but that would be unusual. It is also possible to originate from infection or fracture (very rarely a pars can be thinned out enough to fracture). A new MRI is a first step and laboratory studies as well.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    Avatarjayd10033
    Participant
    Post count: 23

    Thank you. Will keep you posted on mri. Re pars – my understanding was that no bone was removed during my procedure. Just a separation of the muscle and a removal of the herniated disc.

    Is my understanding not correct?

    AvatarDonald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 7982

    Typically some minimal bone is removed for a far-lateral discectomy but not always. Keep us informed please.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    Avatarjayd10033
    Participant
    Post count: 23

    Thanks will do. I’m just wondering if I should be taking walks which aren’t super painful or if I should be immobile which I heard might not
    be beneficial since there is no movement. More to come.

    AvatarDonald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 7982

    If it doesn’t hurt to walk, then short walks will be beneficial.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
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