Viewing 6 posts - 7 through 12 (of 18 total)
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  • Avatarjayd10033
    Participant
    Post count: 23

    Summary : NOT GOOD :)

    I have discitis + an abscess. Good news is caught within 4 weeks of surgery. Bad news is the pain is pretty bad and the treatment is 6 weeks IV antibiotics daily. CRP level was 17, ESR was 49 – so def. infection/inflammation.

    Doc says since I am not presenting with neurological symptoms, that is also a plus and that pain will get better rapidly once I start the IV.

    I also have to have some fluid drained from the abscess to discover what/which organism it is.

    Such a long road to recover!

    What is you experience with this doctor?

    Thanks,
    Joshua

    AvatarDonald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 7982

    An infection (discitis or osteomyelitis) can occur postoperatively. An abcess needs to be drained, either surgically or through a radiologically directed aspiration. This diminishes the infection mass and allows direct knowledge of the type of organism and what antibiotic works best against it. Typically these are treated with 6 weeks of IV antibiotics and then 2-4 weeks of orals. If there is significant involvement of the disc space, 50% of patients will auto fuse (not a bad thing).

    It is a longer road to recover but recovery is the general rule and not the exception.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    Avatarjayd10033
    Participant
    Post count: 23

    The pain is excruciating at times/ but your post gives me a lot of hope. “Doom Googling” is easy to do.

    I hope they do aspirate it soon. Going to infectious disease doc on Thursday to see about antibiotics.

    AvatarDonald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 7982

    You need to have it aspirated now. The longer you wait, the larger the abscess becomes and the more difficult it is to treat the infection. You have to have drainage before antibiotics start to insure a good sample for culture.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    Avatarjayd10033
    Participant
    Post count: 23

    I have not been able to get an appointment with the Infectious Disease doc until Thursday. The interventional radiologist looked at the MRI and said it was too small of an abscess to drain safely (whatever that means) — but that that infectious disease doc would start me on a broad spectrum Thursday and then order a culture for specific organism.

    Does that make sense?

    AvatarDonald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 7982

    Normally, you have the abscess aspirated, culture the fluid and then get placed on antibiotics as antibiotics prior to the culture of the organism can make delayed cultures negative. If you feel sick (fevers, chills, lethargy), you can have blood cultures taken before antibiotics are given to help identify the organism.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
Viewing 6 posts - 7 through 12 (of 18 total)
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