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  • Rivervadas
    Participant
    Post count: 2

    Hi, I am a 44 year old male, 5’7”.
    I have no neck pain but severe arm pain from the elbows down that started 4 months ago and has gotten worse.
    I do not have all the symptoms of myelopathy but my MRI shows severe flattening of the spinal cord with AP cord measuring 7mm at c6-7, which seems to match the nerves involved.
    The spinal cord has completely lost its kidney been shape and is flat looking.
    I have not lost any strength, no gait problems, but my hands go numb and tingle when I put my head back while paddling for surf.
    The neurosurgeon is a very good one, and very conservative. He has expedited my surgery date ahead of others because he believes it’s prudent.
    He says it may not relieve my arm pain but necessary to stop further damage. He says my condition is dangerous.

    Is it possible for central stenosis/myelopathy to affect the nerve roots as well?

    Does surgery sound like the right thing to do?

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8140

    If you have cord flattening with symptoms increased by neck extension, more likely you do have myelopathy and need cervical surgery. However, since you are a paddler, you could have nerve entrapment also in the elbows and wrists (cubital and carpel tunnel syndrome). The physical examination can help to confirm this and an upper extremity EMG/NCV can help to confirm the diagnosis. Nonetheless, your neck most likely needs to be addressed soon.

    See:
    https://neckandback.com/conditions/carpal-tunnel-syndrome/
    https://neckandback.com/conditions/cubital-tunnel-syndrome/

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
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