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  • AvatarMikeSQ
    Participant
    Post count: 2

    Hello Doctor,

    I’m a 28 year old male and I recently had surgery 25 days ago on my c5/c6. I injured myself on July 2019, so I’ve had this injury for about 18 months. It was as the MRI stated a “central/right paracentral c5/c6 herniation resulting in mild stenosis with compression of the thecal sac.”

    After three weeks, I can still feel nerve pain from time to time. The pain is not constant, it’s only felt when in motion at home. I feel the pain in my hands, forearms, shoulders (front and back), and my pec. I can feel the nerve pain slightly if I put my arms above my head, in front of me, or on the side. I can feel the stretch of my nerves even more if I move my hands around while in those positions. I’m currently taking 300 mg of gabapentin 3 times a day to relieve the pain, but it does not seem to help.

    My question is if these nerve symptoms sound common post OP, and if they are how long would it take for these symptoms to dissipate? I was thinking about seeing a neurologist for their opinion around the same time I go for my second post OP follow up (early March).

    Thank you for your time, and hope you’re staying safe during these crazy times

    Best

    Mike

    AvatarDonald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 7849

    Are the symptoms changed in intensity or in distribution or are they the same as before surgery?

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    AvatarMikeSQ
    Participant
    Post count: 2

    Just about the same as before the surgery when it comes to nerve pain.

    AvatarDonald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 7849

    The differential here is a decompressed nerve that is still healing, a chronic nerve injury, a question of the original diagnosis or an incomplete decompression. Normally, a healing nerve will show some improvement either in intensity of pain or less time of pain (or both) so that particular diagnosis might be down the list.If the nerve was not decompressed well or wrong diagnosis, then eventually a selective nerve root block of the root with diagnostic relief will give the correct diagnosis and possibly some long-term relief. Maybe start with an oral steroid treatment.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
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