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  • bnj2201
    Member
    Post count: 3

    I have been having numbness, tingling, hurting in my legs. It used to only be my left leg but has now went to the right leg also. This has been going on for about 2 – 3 years now. More recently within the last 4 months my left arm and hand have started to become tingling numb and it feels like I have electric running through it, and now my right hand is starting to do the same. I also have periods where I get an extremely bad headache and get dizzy, and sometimes I get flushed and hot along with the headache. I had been seeing my pcp and she performed xrays, ct scans, blood work and several physicals and she couldn’t come up with much more then multiple sclerosis and wanted a lumber spine mri and refered me to a neurologist. I started seeing him in july. He ordered a brain mri w wo contrast, that came back normal then he wanted a cspine mri too which also came back normal. He said he was looking for syrinx or chiari. But never found anything. My pcp said that if it was MS the lesions would be in my lumbar spine not in the brain or cspine? I just feel as if I’m not getting any answers would love to know what you think. Keep in mind I’m 19. And I work in healthcare. And I have copies of all the mri’s

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8368

    Your symptoms of progressive paresthesias and pain in all four extremities for 2-3 years associate by headaches, dizziness and flushing could be from many different diagnoses. These symptoms could be all related from one disease process or originate from separate diagnoses.

    Multiple Sclerosis is not an unreasonable diagnosis to consider. You don’t mention your skin tone (MS is more common in younger individuals originating from Northern Europe). Negative MRIs of your neck and brain do not fully rule MS out but with your extent of symptoms, it makes MS very unlikely. A spinal tap would be positive in 60-75% of individuals with MS. Since MS is a disease of the central nervous system, MS would not be found in the lumbar spine and even if it could originate there, would not affect your upper extremities. The physical examination should demonstrate long tract signs (hyper-reflexia, Hoffman’s, clonus, Babinski) in the face of MS.

    Myelopathy would also be unlikely based upon symptoms. If your MRI of the cervical spine was negative, cord generated myelopathy would be ruled out and the MRI would also rule out Arnold Chiari syndrome.

    You may have an inflammatory, metabolic or infectious origin of your symptoms. Polymyalgia Rheumatica, Vitamin B12 deficiency or Lyme disease come to mind.

    You need a top notch neurologist to help you with your diagnosis.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    bnj2201
    Member
    Post count: 3

    I live in Virginia and I am fair complected with red hair and lots of freckles. I have thought about it being a B12 deficiency and i believe i had blood work done for the and it was fine but i’ll have to call my pcp and find out. And i was tested for lyme disease when I was about 10 after I had a bull’s eye appear after a tick bite, but at the time the test showed nothing.

    Thanks!

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8368

    The examples I gave you are but a small fraction of the neurological processes that can cause your symptoms. The target lesion you developed after a tick bite could be the beginning of Lyme disease and the test might have been performed before you developed antibodies. Don’t just focus on Lyme disease however.

    Again- a top notch neurologist is the best direction in my opinion.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
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