Viewing 6 posts - 103 through 108 (of 111 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8409

    I’m going to weigh in on the dangers of prolotherapy. This treatment uses a corrosive fluid that causes damage to the structure it is injected in. Injection in the upper neck especially is highly dangerous as if it inadvertently is injected into the spinal canal or vertebral artery, stroke or cord injury can occur. I think prolotherapy is advised for the sacroiliac joint only and only under certain conditions.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    ftothelo
    Participant
    Post count: 2

    Dear Dr. Corenman,

    i’ve also developed an instability between c1 and c2 (not really sure, because of missing diagnose. it just feels i little bit unstable). My doctors think because of overusage according to an atlasassimilation, which was first noticed at age 25 (i’m 29 now). I do not have any of the symptoms, which are usually described by persons with this condition, except a little bit of headaches sometimes and the feeling, that its a little bit unstable under my head. I came across prolotherapy as my doc told me in 2014 about it, tried for the neck, gave up after 3 sessions after i startet research about it – letting someone pinch needles in my neck didn’t feel right at all… Also i’m from germany and prolotherapy isn’t a usual therapy here, i forgot about it.
    But now i came across this thread and wondered if you could answer me two questions?
    Is it recomended to stretch a neck with istability slightly to release tension in the muscles? Or should i only focus on strenghtening? I’m able to stretch without feeling unstable.
    Why do think prolotherapy can be useful to the si joint only?

    I’m really escited for your answers.

    Thank you and greetings from germany!

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8409

    If you have atlas assimilation, this is a disorder where the atlas failed to separate from the base of the skull. The occipital-atlas articulation (OAA) is fused and this has ramifications for motion. The OAA is responsible for 50% of the flexion/extension motion of the neck (“yes and no” motion) so loss of this joint will increase stress on the lower vertebra. Make sure you don’t have platybasia with the odontoid of C2 protruding into the foramen magnum causing a form of Arnold Chiari syndrome.

    Gentile stretching is OK but you have to be careful that you don’t “overstretch” the neck to gain greater range of motion. I am a big fan of strengthening to control abnormal motion so that is the direction I would go in.

    Prolotherapy uses a destructive fluid to gain scar tissue. Injected into dangerous areas (the cervical spine comes to mind), this technique can cause damage to sensitive structures such as the spinal cord or vertebral artery. I do not recommend prolotherapy for the neck.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    ftothelo
    Participant
    Post count: 2

    Thank you for your fast response Dr. Corenman!
    My Doc said the MRI’s haven’t shown anything special except the fused facette joints between atlas and occiput and that i dont have to fear chiari.
    Great, that you share your experience and knowledge here!

    Jasper175
    Participant
    Post count: 7

    ???
    Trying not to freak out now
    I, laying on a couch.. progressively through the years it started with the sound of dry breath he and sand paper when turning my head. Of course Doctors near me just give Advil and Creams and recommend PT

    Now suddenly I had massive anxiety issues the past 2 years. So a lot of psychosomatic tension added.

    While doing Jumping Jacks or felt like my head would skull would pop off the atlas (head lift off my neck$ and clunk back down.
    If my heart rate is up while exercising my pulse would clunk through the occipital area (loud pulse pounding top of neck).
    Now I have this very weird pain when turn or extend my head.
    The pain is chronic now.

    X-Ray shows no subluxation other than my curve is not the best. My chiro says my Atlas C1 is locked up.

    My ortho or Primary hasn’t approved MRI yet. I wonder if I should request with contrast?

    I don’t know if some of this mental anxiety or panic is a result of or the cause of? maybe even the SVT (heart arrhythmia / Tachycardia).

    It seems this issue is rare in the book of diagnosis

    I don’t know what to do

    Rob

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8409

    The noise you hear is typically produced by irregularities the facet sliding surfaces. Normally, the facets are covered with a glistening, perfectly smooth frictionless surfaces of cartilage. As we age, these surfaces become irregular and dried out. When they move against each other, they “catch” and cause the sounds of “sand in the joints”. These sounds are not dangerous if there is no pain. Generally, even with pain, this condition is not dangerous (but painful).

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
Viewing 6 posts - 103 through 108 (of 111 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.