What is Mild Ventral Cord Mass Effect C4 C5. Trying to understand that on MRI

///What is Mild Ventral Cord Mass Effect C4 C5. Trying to understand that on MRI
What is Mild Ventral Cord Mass Effect C4 C5. Trying to understand that on MRI
Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 9 total)
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  • AvatarSandylynn
    Participant
    Post count: 5

    I’m trying to understand what c4 c5 Right uncovertebral Ridging with mild foraminal narrowing based on axial T2 weighted imaging. Right paracentral protrusion with mild ventral cord mass effect.

    I have been told it’s nothing to worry over but not very sure. The mass effect concerned me? He Also has other protrusions on other cervical spine also. Any help to what that means?

    Subject has pain in upper back and down right arm with strength loss in hand and it tingles.

    AvatarDonald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 7138

    This sounds menacing but is easy to understand (“Right paracentral protrusion with mild ventral cord mass effect”). A protrusion generally means a disc herniation but occasionally can mean a bone spur. Paracentral is the location, just off of midline. Ventral is in front. Cord mass effect means this herniation pushes slightly against the spinal cord-not a big deal.

    The foraminal stenosis you note is at C4-5. This means the C5 nerve involvement would not radiate to the hand as this nerve stops above the elbow.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    AvatarSandylynn
    Participant
    Post count: 5

    Thank you so much for replying and that does make me feel better! I did not include the whole mri with that question so I have included it in this so you may understand better why he has numbness and tingling of the right hand and even arm at times. His strength in the hand has been affected also. But is gradually improving some. Thank you again! He has been referred to neurosurgeon as he was seeing an ortho and they can’t help anymore with the neck.

    imaging of the cervical spine wasperformed. No intravenous contrast was administered.COMPARISON: None.FINDINGS:Alignment: Physiologic.Vertebrae: No fracture, evidence of discitis, or bone lesion.Cord: Normal signal and morphology.Posterior Fossa, vertebral arteries, paraspinal tissues: Negative.Disc levels:C2-3: Unremarkable.C3-4: Small right foraminal protrusion with mild narrowing based onaxial T2 weighted imaging.C4-5: Right uncovertebral ridging with mild foraminal narrowingbased on axial T2 weighted imaging. Right paracentral protrusionwith mild ventral cord mass effect.C5-6: Disc narrowing with small uncovertebral spurs. Spurring on theright causes moderate foraminal stenosis. Patent canalC6-7: Disc narrowing with biforaminal protrusion and uncovertebralridging. Moderate to advanced biforaminal stenosis.C7-T1:Unrmarkable

    AvatarDonald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 7138

    “C5-6: Disc narrowing with small uncovertebral spurs. Spurring on the right causes moderate foraminal stenosis…….C6-7: Disc narrowing with biforaminal protrusion and uncovertebral ridging. Moderate to advanced biforaminal stenosis”>

    There is right foraminal stenosis at C5-6 compressing the C6 nerve root. At C6-7, there is bilateral foraminal stenosis causing compression of both C7 nerve roots. See this section to understand what nerve roots radiate to.

    https://neckandback.com/conditions/symptoms-of-cervical-nerve-injuries/

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    AvatarSandylynn
    Participant
    Post count: 5

    Thank you so much! You have been a great help. Hoping he don’t have to have surgery.

    AvatarSandylynn
    Participant
    Post count: 5

    This is last question. He asked if your thoughts by looking at the findings he would have to possibly have surgery or if possible therapy instead?

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