Tagged: ,

Viewing 5 posts - 1 through 5 (of 5 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • Daniellemc
    Participant
    Post count: 4

    Dr. Corenman, I had an l5-s1 microdiscectomy exactly 3 weeks ago today. The nerve root being pinched was on my left side. However, the original MRI showed I also had a herniation at l4-l5 but this disc was giving me no troubles at the time and so it was essentially ignored. That herniation was on the right side. After my l5-s1 microdiscectomy, my symptoms have been up and down. Every day has been completely different but I would definitely say it’s doing better than day 1 of the surgery. A couple things are sticking out to me though and I’m not sure if they should be looked at further. One, is that a lot of my trouble now is on the right side (where the l4-l5 herniation is located). As I mentioned before, this herniation never bothered me before surgery. It was not operated on nor was it even discussed. I have experienced tingling like I did in the left leg, sciatica type pain in my buttocks, and muscle twitching around my calf. These are all new. The twitching is usually when I am lying down but I have noticed I twitch quite a bit. I also twitch in the left side some, as well as in my back. It’s very prevalent at night. My second concern, is that the left leg has gained some sciatica pain back that had diminished completely after surgery. I tried to perform the straight leg test which I could not do before the surgery and was able to do it post op just fine. However, as of a couple days ago, that pain has returned and I’m unable to straighten all the way. My lower buttocks has also had a sharp pain in it. Nothing is radiating to the foot and the numbness is gone but the occasional tingling is there and the sciatica is definitely worse since I first woke up from surgery. I am so worried of reherniation. I also have Ehlers Danlos syndrome. I’m not sure if this would effect my symptoms or recovery in any way. I hope you are able to assist me in some way. Thank you!

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8459

    You underwent a left “l5-s1 microdiscectomy exactly 3 weeks ago today”. You then note “original MRI showed I also had a herniation at l4-l5 (right) but this disc was giving me no troubles at the time and so it was essentially ignored”.

    This is not unusual to leave an asymptomatic herniated disc on the opposite side at a different level (depending upon the size of the disc herniation) as long as you had a conversation with potential risks.

    “I have experienced tingling (on the right) like I did in the left leg, sciatica type pain in my buttocks, and muscle twitching around my calf. These are all new”.

    It is not unheard of to have some symptoms occur on the opposite side with a preexisting but non-symptomatic disc herniation. Post-operative swelling can temporarily aggravate this HNP. As long as the symptoms are tolerable and no weakness associated with this nerve root is noted, this can be watched.

    “My second concern, is that the left leg has gained some sciatica pain back that had diminished completely after surgery. I tried to perform the straight leg test which I could not do before the surgery and was able to do it post op just fine. However, as of a couple days ago, that pain has returned and I’m unable to straighten all the way. My lower buttocks has also had a sharp pain in it. Nothing is radiating to the foot and the numbness is gone but the occasional tingling is there and the sciatica is definitely worse since I first woke up from surgery”.

    Post-operative recurrent disc herniations are not uncommon but other common post-operative disorders can occur which can increase nerve symptoms like post-operative swelling and a seroma (a collection of fluid). Give it some time and consider asking your surgeon for a short course of oral steroids. If symptoms continue to progress (get worse) or you have increased weakness, a new MRI should be considered.

    “I also have Ehlers Danlos syndrome. I’m not sure if this would effect my symptoms or recovery in any way”. Generally Ehlers Danlos syndrome can increase the chances of herniation but does not get in the way of healing.

    Dr. Corenman

    Daniellemc
    Participant
    Post count: 4

    I’m not sure I was given any potential risks from my surgeon about the other asymptomatic herniation before surgery. He honestly never really discussed it with me. He only talked about the one we operated on but was aware of the other at the time. I also wanted to mention to you something else that just started today…I’ve had some popping in the back where the incision is that doesn’t really feel like the kind of pop when you crack your joints. It feels more like when things are sliding around over top of one another. It’s been doing this quite a bit tonight and if I stand in one position for even 1 minute, as soon as move it pops. It feels better when it does that though. It almost seems as if something is not positioned right? And it’s a little discomforting until I move and it does that little “pop”. I’m still only concerned about reherniation due to my ehlers and the symptoms that have come since surgery that I previously mentioned. I go back in 3 weeks but if you think I should call before then and update them about these symptoms I will definitely do so. Thank you for your time, Dr.

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8459

    With Ehlers Danlos syndrome, you are more mobile so some “popping” would not be unexpected due to your hypermobility. This can be a fact joint or even some small tendon or ligament sliding over a bony surface not unlike a guitar string being plucked. That I would not worry about at this time and it should settle down.

    Your upper level opposite sided non-symptomatic herniation you should have had a discussion that it was not causing pain or numbness at the time but could in the future. If it was not large enough (a value judgement), it could be left alone as it was not symptomatic.

    Dr. Corenman

    Pashta
    Participant
    Post count: 4

    I’m new, I hope it’s ok to reply to another’s question here? I know hEDS is rare or at least rarely diagnosed, so I think I might be helpful here since I have been diagnosed with it as well. I have done a LOT of research on the subject and must say that yes, our type of EDS absolutely interferes with healing. I have personal experience with this from before I knew I had EDS. I had surgery and the healing was longer and left terrible scarring. I believe my main back problem is the lack of proper healing from an injury years ago, it seems to be how many people find out they have EDS is that they get injured and never heal or not properly. I was told to always tell a surgeon about EDS because it makes a big difference, for example I bled profusely during my surgery according to the doctor (EDS causes that). Hope that helps!

Viewing 5 posts - 1 through 5 (of 5 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.