Viewing 6 posts - 19 through 24 (of 28 total)
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  • Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8409

    You can think that way. You are certainly better than prior to surgery. The question remains if you still have a residual disorder that can respond to surgery.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    ftkm92
    Participant
    Post count: 28

    Hi,

    Do you consider that I am having failed back surgery syndrome. My surgeon says the spine is good after the surgery from the latest MRI. I went to a pain management Doctor and she wrote Failed Back surgery syndrome due to lumbar spondylosis with spinal stenosis two months ago.

    I tried the Pens treatment but I feels is not working for me because I still required me to take neurontin, targin and other pain medications.

    I do not know what should I do now.

    My surgeon not sure what is going with me because MRI and other test shows no nerve damage or any compression.
    According to my surgeon he says it could be the granulation tissue giving the problem and he suggested me to go for physio. Currently I am on physio but is like not working for me.

    thanks.

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8409

    FBSS (failed back surgery syndrome) is a general category where surgery that was planned and expected to yield a certain result did not come close to that result. I think that because you can now walk where before you could not seems to be a successful surgery.

    The question is whether or not there are unresolved issues still present that can be modified to give you further improvement. You noted certain findings earlier that might be correctable. It might behoove you to ask for a consultation from an experienced revision surgeon in your area to see if there are other possibilities for surgical correction.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    ftkm92
    Participant
    Post count: 28

    Hi.

    I just got my SSEP results.

    LEFT LEG.
    latencies N8 absent. What is N8 absent mean?

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8409

    I do use these SSEP (somato-sensory evoked potentials) tests in an asleep patient (called neuro-monitoring) during surgery. I don’t use SSEP testing in my practice in an awake patient as if the test is not performed perfectly, the results are widely interpretable. I cannot help you with these results.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    ftkm92
    Participant
    Post count: 28

    My last surgery was October 2014. I still get those pulling sensations on my left leg when I sit and laying down on my bed. What are the reason of those pulling sensations?

Viewing 6 posts - 19 through 24 (of 28 total)
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