Viewing 6 posts - 13 through 18 (of 23 total)
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  • AvatarDonald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 7982

    Getting a new MRI is generally never a bad idea. With the amount of your anxiety, it is most likely a good idea. If nothing is there, it will settle your nerves, if something is there, it can be addressed.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    AvatarBattista85
    Participant
    Post count: 12

    I plan to get the MRI and post the results here.

    To follow up on your original response, I read your article about nerve recovery and it’s a bit overwhelming to me. Is there a way to know what kind of nerve injury I had? Is the fact that I still can’t do a single calf raise on the effected leg a big concern? How long typically will this take to come back and is there anything I can do to help the process along? The numbness I can live with but I have a very active career and 1 year old daughter so the muscle weakness is very disheartening.

    AvatarDonald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 7982

    There is no way to discover what type of nerve injury you have suffered except by waiting on recovery.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    AvatarBattista85
    Participant
    Post count: 12

    Hey doc, just a quick question before my MRI on Monday. My first MRI says extruded HNP measuring 2.1 x 1.2 x 1.3 cm. That seems awfully large and has me (again) nervous about recovery. I read something about how anything over 6mm is considered severe.

    Basically my question is, in your experience, is a large herniation like this typically harder to co e back from or is there little correlation? Thanks in advance

    • This reply was modified 2 weeks ago by AvatarBattista85.
    AvatarDonald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 7982

    Generally, a larger herniation causes greater compression on biological structures and the greater the torsion of the nerve root, the greater the damage. Motor portions of the nerve root are less susceptible to compression so the presence of motor weakness indicates a greater force of compression of the root.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    AvatarBattista85
    Participant
    Post count: 12

    In your experience, is my herniation bigger than most? Have you seen people regain function after such a large herniation?

    My doctor wants me to start PT next week (assuming MRI is clean). I’m hoping this helps…

    • This reply was modified 2 weeks ago by AvatarBattista85.
Viewing 6 posts - 13 through 18 (of 23 total)
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