Viewing 6 posts - 13 through 18 (of 89 total)
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  • JBoz
    Participant
    Post count: 51

    Hello, Dr. Corenman,

    I found out today, that my posterior fusion will be done with two rods, and six screws… titanium. The manufacture will be Globus. I’m really starting to have a good feeling about this surgery. I think I mentioned a plate and six screws in this thread previously. It really would be a neat thing, if the chest pain and left arm pain diminished during recovery. I’ve been all cleared through my cardiologist… ready for surgery.

    I’m so glad you have taken the time to answer my questions. You are top notch for taking such time to do this for people.

    I think… I would rather have the rods than the plate.

    John

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8652

    Please keep in contact and let us know how you do with surgery.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    JBoz
    Participant
    Post count: 51

    Dr. Corenman, it’s been awhile. I have been meaning to get back to you on my surgery. Surgery went well, but I have been having severe pain in only the bottom right on my surgery site. This is about 1/2 inch to the right of the bottom of the incision. I can feel the typical neck pain my surgeon told me I would probably have the rest of my life. This one spot has been very problematic, and is severe compared to the mild pain along the shoulders and remainder of my neck. I had 3 sets of trigger point done, and 30 sessions of therapy to try and see if the muscle was knotted up.

    I don’t know what this 6 month post operative neck pain might be at this point, we have tried everything. Another disappointment was the remaining severe chest pain, in which I have been to three specialists to try to figure out. Angiogram, Bravo Endoscopy, multiple chest X-rays, three years of unknown severe chest pain. I was really hoping for this to be resolved.

    I do believe the C3 C4 will finally fuse, as well the step off at C4 C5 in time. I don’t have any clue on the stabbing type pain in the spot I mentioned above. This pain is as bad as the pain I had prior to surgery, just in one spot.

    That is the surgery update, and perhaps you might know the reason for the one location of severe pain at the bottom right of the posterior incision. It feels deep to me, the therapy works for awhile, but it comes right back. Dry trigger point needling was even performed, with no real improvement.

    Any idea’s would be wonderful. I hope it’s not hardware related.

    My pain doctor ordered a MRI of my thoracic spine, to see if there could be a connection to the even worse chest pain. This is what they found on the MRI.

    The spinal cord has normal signal characteristics. Negative for intradural or extradural masses.

    Vertebral height is anatomic. Vertebral height is maintained at all levels. Negative for compression fractures. Vertebral marrow is negative for infiltrating processes and osseous destruction. Benign hemangioma in T7 vertebral body. Paraspinal soft tissues are within normal limits.

    T3 T4: Very small left paracentral disc protrusion, not clinically significant.

    T4 T5 small central disc protrusion causes ventral thecal sac compression with localized cord effacement. No spinal cord edema.

    Remaining intervertebral discs demonstrate age- appropriate mild desiccation, but are otherwise normal. Central canal and foramina are patent at all levels. Mild facet arthropathy at lower thoracic levels.

    Benign hemangioma in T7, not sure how they know the tumor is benign. It is a circle size, from one end of the bone to the other.

    Impression: T4 T5 central disc protrusion with spinal cord effacement, but no cord edema.

    My concern is traditional methods, epidurals, and perhaps nerve burning have all failed on me in the past. I have also read about T4 syndrome, and the chest pain symptoms all seem on the mark. I guess I hope this is the answer to my chest pain. I truly love your website, and the time you put in to help others. Your knowledge has been spot on so far.

    I must say I had a very good surgeon, and I pray this new finding is the cause of my chest pain. I would do anything to have this chest pain taken off my shoulders. Perhaps this could be the answer. I just can’t live with this pain the balance of my life, as a single father of 49 years of age.

    I appreciate your time Dr. Corenman, sorry to have taken so long on my surgery follow up.

    John

    PS, You have a very interesting video of the thoracic spine as well. I have told my surgeon of the MRI, he will be reviewing the report and images.

    JBoz
    Participant
    Post count: 51

    Dr. Corenman, I should add my left arm and shoulder still have patches of the feeling of being punched. The left two digits on my hand have tingling and numbness as well, almost constantly. Left arm has always been one of the problems as well. That along with the chest pain was always a very scary combination.

    Thanks Again

    John

    JBoz
    Participant
    Post count: 51

    In trying to research issues with the thoracic spine, I came across this article. It describes the T4 to T9 as the critical zone. I wonder if there is any truth to this statement. I’ve had ongoing bladder issues, along with my severe chest pain. I also feel left shoulder, behind the shoulder pain, around the front of the neck too. I also feel my organs are failing at times, so I drink a large amount of water. I wanted to leave nothing out. Everything I’m finding is telling me this severe chest pain and several other problems, may be a result of this disc protrusion at the T4 and T5 location. I can also say my chest pain just keeps progressing. It always comes with very bad left arm pain, which in return causes severe anxiety, and a rise in my blood pressure.

    I think that cover about everything Dr. Corenman.

    Thanks again, for your past information, it was so very helpful.

    Sincerely
    JBoz

    http://www.houstonmethodist.org/orthopedics/where-does-it-hurt/upper-back/thoracic-disc-herniation/

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8652

    T4-9 is somewhat a critical zone for the thoracic spine. There is more pressure (bending forces) here so the stress is greater.Bladder issues could possibly originate from the thoracic spine but that would be a rare occurrence. You would have signs of myelopathy (see website) along with other problems. Chest pain can also originate from the thoracic spine either from nerve compression which would cause pain, numbness and paresthesias (pins and needles) radiating around the chest wall or from the spine itself (degenerative disc disease and hyperkyphosis-see Scheuermann’s disease on this site).

    Back of the shoulder blade pain (scapular pain) can also originate from the cervical spine (neck).

    I cannot comment on your feeling that your “organs are failing at times, so I drink a large amount of water”. I am unclear what that can be.

    Chest pain can also occur from the heart, lungs or aorta so I will assume you have checked these sources out.
    Your statement “I can also say my chest pain just keeps progressing. It always comes with very bad left arm pain, which in return causes severe anxiety, and a rise in my blood pressure” concerns me. This could be pain of cardiac origin so you need to get this checked out at least by your family practice physician if not a cardiologist.

    Your herniation in the thoracic spine could be causing chest pain but you need to check all the other possibilities out now.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
Viewing 6 posts - 13 through 18 (of 89 total)
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