Minor Osteophytic change c/5 & c6/7

///Minor Osteophytic change c/5 & c6/7
Minor Osteophytic change c/5 & c6/7
Viewing 4 posts - 1 through 4 (of 4 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • AvatarDamianlm
    Participant
    Post count: 2

    Hi, I would like some advice please. Some time ago I was attacked by a mental health patient on the hospital ward I work on. I was placed in a head lock and choked and my neck wrenched for approx 5 minutes. I have had constant pain in my neck,left shoulder and back since. I recently had an mri – small broad based disc/osteophytic bars at c6/7 and c5/6 are more prominent within the lateral aspects and causing minor bilateral neural foraminal narrowing worse at c6/7 and more on to the left. My doctor does not believe this was caused by the attack nor should be giving me pain. But I am in daily pain and only since the attack. In your opinion could thus have been caused by the attack, give me such pain and do you have any advice that may help? Thank you for any advice given.

    AvatarDonald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 7070

    Typically. disc degeneration is present but asymptomatic when a significant force (such as “in a head lock and choked and my neck wrenched for approx 5 minutes”) causes injury to the neck. That is, a normal non-degenerative neck has less of a chance to develop an injury with the same force as a previous degenerative but non-symptomatic neck does.

    Neck pain can be generated by injured discs, facets or even occasionally nerve root compression. A work-up needs to be conducted to see what is causing pain.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    AvatarDamianlm
    Participant
    Post count: 2

    Thank you so much for your reply and information, something to take back to my Dr at least. I’m currently off work because of this, but will be returning to work soon. Do you think there is risk of serious injury if something like this was to happen again? I am concerned about returning to that environment while still in pain and ending up with a serious neck injury that I may regret for some time….the neck not being something I wish to risk if this pain is indicative of damage. Thank you

    AvatarDonald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 7070

    I would not want to personally be in a situation where I could be assaulted but the chance of severe neck injury (spinal cord injury) is most likely not high. Still, maybe find another job that puts you at less risk.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
Viewing 4 posts - 1 through 4 (of 4 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.