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  • PFCRANGER
    Member
    Post count: 36

    HELLO DR. CORENMAN, MY NAME IS CHRISTOPHER AND I AM A 29YR OLD POLICE OFFICER FORM NEW YORK CITY. IN MARCH OF THIS YEAR I WAS INVOLVED IN A CAR ACCIDENT WHEN MY POLICE CAR WAS HIT BY A TRACKER TRAILER. I SUFFERED A L5-S1 DISC HERNIATION( NUCLEUS PULPOSUS, COMPRESSED S1 NERVE ROOT AND SPINAL STENOSIS. THE PAIN WAS HORRIBLE RUNNING FROM MY BUTT DOWN MY RIGHT LEG, PARALYZING AT TIMES. NO PAIN MEDS I WAS GIVIEN WORKED. I SEE A NEUROSURGEON HE PREFORMED A LUMBAR LAMINECTOMY WITH DECOMPRESSION AND NEUROLYSIS. THEN ABOUT 2 WEEKS LATER THE PAIN AND ISSUES RETURNED. MRI WAS TAKEN AND SHOWED A RE-HERNIATED DISC, ANOTHER SURGERY WAS PREFORMED SAME TECHNIQUE. ITS NOW 4 WEEKS AFTER 2ND SURGERY AND THE PAIN IS HAPPENING AGAIN. HE PRESCRIBED NEUROTINE AND NOW A LIDOCAIN PATCH STILL NO RELIEF. MY QUESTION TO YOU IS, WHAT COULD THIS BE CAUSED BY? ANOTHER HERNIATED DISC ? IS A FUSION THE NEXT OPTION? AND CAN I RETURN IN YOUR OPINION TO POLICE WORK? IF I WERE TO SEE YOU WHAT WOULD YOU HAVE DONE AND WHAT WOULD YOU DO? I FEEL THAT I SHOULD GET ANOTHER MRI WHEN I SEE THE DR. FOR THE POST APPOINTMENT. THESE SURGERIES WERE PREFORMED IN JUNE AND AUGUST OF THIS YEAR. I THANK YOU FOR TAKING THE TIME TO READ MY CONCERNS TO YOU, I HAVE WATCHED YOU VIDEOS AND READ THE INFORMATION ON THE WEB SITE AND FOUND IT TO VERY INFORMATIVE. HOPE TO SPEAK WITH YOU SOON.

    arboc50
    Member
    Post count: 7

    I’m curious about this too. It seems your question might have been missed. Maybe myself replying can bring it to the top of the list.

    Thanks Doctor!

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8409

    You are correct. I missed this question- sorry for the delay.

    You have unfortunately suffered at least one recurrent herniation and possibly two in a short period of time. I have seen this before in some patients that have come in to ask the same questions. The chance of three disc herniations in a very short period of time is remote but assuming that you have herniated yet again, that does not help you.

    Three herniations on the same side at the same level normally requires a fusion of that level. The reason is that the disc can be expected to continue to herniate and the nerve root then becomes battered. These roots are relatively sensitive and repeated compression can damage the nerve permanently.

    One question I have is if there is weakness of the muscles attached to this root? In my opinion, motor weakness requires a quicker response to relieve nerve compression as the motor portion of the nerve root does not heal as well as the sensory and pain portions of the nerve do.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    PFCRANGER
    Member
    Post count: 36

    THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR REPLYING TO MY QUESTION. I GOT WORRIED IT WAS MISSED AS WELL.

    PFCRANGER
    Member
    Post count: 36

    Thank you very much for getting back to me I can’t really say if i am having muscle weakness, but i do know when i move the pain is paralyzing and sends a jolt of pain that feels like fire running straight down my leg. I have been experiencing other weird sensations and spasms in my foot.There are times when my leg feels weak and that it will give out. When i do my walks it become painful and sitting after awhile as well becomes painful. Usually these pains occur only within 30 min of any activity. Its become a bit discouraging because i think i should be feeling better now but i am only feeling worse then before the second surgery.

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8409

    Pain with sitting and “jolts” down your leg might signal another disc herniation. There is the chance that there is no new herniation but the nerve root is still so swollen from two compressive injuries in a short period of time.

    To check for motor weakness, there is a simple test you can perform yourself. Balance on one foot on the painful leg while steadying yourself on a counter or wall with your hands. Just use your hands for balance and do not support your weight with your hands. Perform ten heel raises on the painful leg. Then do the same on the non-painful leg.

    Compare the ability to do these heel raises one side to the other. If you are substantially slower or cannot complete the ten raises with your painful leg, there is most likely motor weakness. Do the same test but this time, raise the ball of your foot off the floor ten time (toe raises). Compare both sides. Again, if one is substantially slower or you cannot complete ten on the painful side, there is motor weakness present.

    Either the current intensity of your pain or weakness if present should warrant a new MRI. If the nerve is compressed by another herniation, surgery should be considered. If the nerve is inflamed, an epidural injection or even an oral dose of steroids might be helpful.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
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