Viewing 4 posts - 1 through 4 (of 4 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • Cglossop
    Participant
    Post count: 2

    I have pasted my mri findings below. Could you please give me an opinion if acdf surgery is warranted. I am having left shoulder and bicep weakness currently for about two months with atrophy.

    Thank you.

    MRI of the cervical spine demonstrates a C2-3, mild disc desiccation without significant stenosis. At C3-4, there is mild disc desiccation with mild central and foraminal stenosis. At C4-5, there is severe loss of disc height with a central disc herniation mobile grade 1 degenerative spondylolisthesis with 7 mm of space available for the spinal cord consistent with severe central stenosis with compression and deformation of ventral aspect of the spinal cord as well as severe bilateral foraminal stenosis with compression of the exiting bilateral C5 nerve root. At C5-6, there is severe loss of disc height with a central disc herniation with 7.5 mm of space available for the spinal cord consistent with severe central stenosis with compression and deformation of the ventral aspect of the spinal cord as well as right greater than left foraminal stenosis with compression the exiting right greater than left C6 nerve root. At C6-7, there is a broad-based disc bulge with 8.5 mm of space available for the spinal cord consistent with severe right greater than left central stenosis and moderate bilateral foraminal stenosis. At C7-T1, there is a well-hydrated disc without significant stenosis.

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8140

    This would be a snapshot of your current problems but here we are.

    At “C4-5, there is severe loss of disc height with a central disc herniation mobile grade 1 degenerative spondylolisthesis with 7 mm of space available for the spinal cord consistent with severe central stenosis with compression and deformation of ventral aspect of the spinal cord as well as severe bilateral foraminal stenosis with compression of the exiting bilateral C5 nerve root”.

    This means that you have an unstable degenerative spondylolisthesis at C4-5 (https://neckandback.com/conditions/degenerative-spondylolisthesis-cervical/) with central stenosis (https://neckandback.com/conditions/cervical-central-stenosis-and-myelopathy/) and foraminal stenosis (https://neckandback.com/conditions/radiculopathy-pinched-nerve-in-neck/).

    “At C5-6, there is severe loss of disc height with a central disc herniation with 7.5 mm of space available for the spinal cord consistent with severe central stenosis with compression and deformation of the ventral aspect of the spinal cord as well as right greater than left foraminal stenosis with compression the exiting right greater than left C6 nerve root”. The two lower hyperlinks above apply to this level. This is the level that corresponds to your biceps weakness (compression of the C6 nerve root).
    Finally, “At C6-7, there is a broad-based disc bulge with 8.5 mm of space available for the spinal cord consistent with severe right greater than left central stenosis and moderate bilateral foraminal stenosis”.

    As a general rule, you will more likely than not need surgery- a 3 level ACDF as you have severe disc disease with the superior level instability (C4-5) and severe compressive changes at the two levels below. You are not a candidate for artificial disc replacements. See (https://neckandback.com/treatments/anterior-cervical-decompression-and-fusion-acdf/)

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    Cglossop
    Participant
    Post count: 2

    Dr. Corenman thank you for your input. That’s what I’ve been told as well. I appreciate you taking the time to read and respond to my question.

    I’m an avid weightlifter are there certain exercises you would recommend against or to avoid once resuming exercise?
    I’ve weight trained for almost 20 years and would like to continue once recovered, but don’t want to exacerbate any issues.

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8140

    The cervico-thoracic muscle connections (neck-shoulder) are the ones not to overdo. You will have greater stress on C7-T1 and C3-4 and you have a propensity for disc degeneration so don’t load your neck and keep your muscles strong without high stress weights.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
Viewing 4 posts - 1 through 4 (of 4 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.