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  • saskia
    Member
    Post count: 3

    Hello,

    I have trouble understanding why my back hurts and how to stop the pain.
    I am 22, female and I’ve been having this back pain for 3 weeks now and it’s not getting any better.

    The diagnosis of one doctor was thoracic syndrome. She said two of my rips were dislocated. Another doctor said that I have mysclerosis in the big trapezius muscle. My whole musculature in the right back and neck is EXTREMELY tense.
    Today I was at physiotherapy. The massage to relax the tense muscles hurt so much that I could hardly bear it. There are two points that hurt the most, I think next to the TH2 vertebrae. One on the right side and one on the left.
    I also have a constant pressure on what I would identify as my gullet. It literally feels like someones poking against my gullet from the inside (right). It’s extremely irritating.

    Yeah, I don’t know what to do about all of that. I feel like nothing is helping in any way. I tried many different things now and I don’t want this backpain to become chronic.

    So is there any way that I can get my muscle to relax?, should I ask for a radiograph or mri?

    I’m thankful for any advice on how to deal with this.

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8408

    You complain of significant neck and trapezius pain (the muscle in the shoulder). 95% of the time, these complaints are due to a disc herniation at the lower two discs in the neck (C5-6 and C6-7). A thorough physical examination will uncover this diagnosis (decreased reflex, sensory deficit or motor weakness). If your pain seems to be worse with bending your head backwards and better with putting your neck on your chest, this is most likely a pinched nerve in the neck.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    saskia
    Member
    Post count: 3

    Hello,

    actually the pain is worse with putting my neck on my chest, so no pinched nerve.
    I do have pain when I put my head on my left shoulder.

    A disc herniation is a severe thing, right?
    I haven’t noticed any numbness. What do you mean by decreased reflex oder motor weakness?

    Should I ask for a mri? I feel so unsure about the diagnosis.

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8408

    Flexing the head forward and inducing the pain still could be from nerve compression but is more unusual. A disc herniation may or may not be significant. If this compression is causing nerve dysfunction, then it is as significant as the quality of the symptoms.

    Decreased reflex and motor weakness would be noted on a physical examination.

    At this point, you need more information. A knowledgable physician or chiropractor who can perform a good physical examination is in order. I think X-rays at this point might be helpful.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    saskia
    Member
    Post count: 3

    Hello,

    So i was at the physicians office and physiotherapy today. Physiotherapy was first. Everything still hurts. The physiotherapist said that i have pain from th2-th6 and still in the trapezius muscle.

    I have to say, that i’m not a fan of the physician. I am from
    germany. Here the doctors talk to you for 3 minites max, today i feel as if she talked to me for 1 minute. I wanted
    xrays of the th and the c vertebrae but nobody really cared about that so only a xray of the th part was made. Which showed no abnormality.

    All she said is that i should train the muscles although training hurts.

    If i change the physician during one quarter i have to pay an extra fee. and besides i don’t know if that will be better.

    Should i search for another physician? Honestly a thorough physical examination has never been made and i don’t feel like she’s listening to what i’ m saying either.

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8408

    You would think that there are many physicians that have great spine experience as spinal disorders are the second most common reason to visit with a doctor. Unfortunately- there are very few physicians that have great spine knowledge and I assume the problem in Germany is the same as in the States.

    Most commonly, upper thoracic pain is caused by the cervical spine but most non-spine physicians look at imaging only of the thoracic spine as “that is where the pain is”. I believe that instead of trying to replace your primary doctor, obtain a referral to a spine specialist. The mainstay of diagnosis is a thorough history and physical examination followed by at least X-rays.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
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