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  • Heidi
    Member
    Post count: 6

    I have just received a report of MRI on my cervical spine, first one ever.

    Had C-Spine xray year and a half ago, showed some degeneration. So for me this has been an ongoing thing.
    Just want some relief so I can have my life back.

    Wondering what this report has revealed. I have parasthesia in left arm, neck and arm pain when sitting or driving, can’t drive a car without excruciating pain, can’t sleep. Have been off work for 4 months, a healthcare professional, have done a lot of heavy lifting.
    Went to er recently with chest pains, and facial numbness, can this be related to MRI findings?
    Have my first appointment with Neurologist in two weeks for a nerve conduction test and consultation. My NP is not too concerned about the MRI’s results, but I cannot tolerate much more pain. It has taken over my life, I am very sad, and tired. Just wiped out.

    MRI Findings-
    Normal caliber cord is unremarkable. There is mild degenerative change at c6-c7 with reduced disc height and spurs. Right assymetric disc osteophyte complex at this level indents the thecal sac without deform from the spinal cord.
    There is lesser disc dessication at c4-c5 and c5-c6 where bulging discs indent the thecal sac without deforming the spinal cord.
    Remaining cervical and upper thoracic discs are relatively preserved. There is no disc extrusion, canal stenosis, or significant foraminal narrowing but there is an 8mm right arachnoid diverticulum c5-c6 intervertabral foramen.

    Ok, so I’ve done a little digging on the arachnoid diverticula, is this something to be concerned about?

    Would this MRI explain why I am in pain?
    My NP seems to think that PT will be the only solution, but have done 2 months @ twice a week without any relief.
    I have been taking NSAIDS, and heat therapy, and a topical NSAID, no relief.

    I would be so happy to hear any kind of response, been feeling like I’m hauling a heavy load here.

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8468

    Arachnoid diverticula might be another term for a Tarlov cyst or a cystic root sleeve dilation as these diverticula would be rare to be located at the nerve root sleeve. Also, this cyst is on your right side whereas your symptoms are located on your left side.

    Radiological reports you must know are interpretations from the radiologist. I would assume that there is no foraminal stenosis on your left side based upon the reading but
    I am always suspicious when I cannot personally read the MRI myself.

    Arm and shoulder pain does not have to originate from a nerve root compression. Thoracic outlet syndrome and rotator cuff injuries can also cause similar symptoms.

    Dr. Corenman

    Heidi
    Member
    Post count: 6

    Thank you for your quick reply. :-) I am scheduled for a nerve conduction test and consult with a neurologist next week. Hopefully everything will be explained to me at that time. Thank you so very much again, your advice is definitely appreciated!

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8468

    Nerve conduction tests (EMGs) will only be positive (show something is present) if there is nerve damage that leads to motor weakness. This test will not diagnose thoracic outlet syndrome, cervical nerve compression causing pain but not weakness or rotator cuff injury. Hopefully, this neurologist will also give you a thorough physical examination and that will lead him or her to the correct diagnosis.

    Dr. Corenman

    Heidi
    Member
    Post count: 6

    Thank you for your input. Very interesting!
    Should I ask him about this? I don’t want to come off as questioning his opinion, but I also want to make sure he explores all aspects of my concerns. :-)
    I have looked into the Thoracic Outlet Syndrome and it seems quite similar to what I am experiencing; the hospital visits for chest pain, facial numbness, etc. It’s quite striking actually, the similarities are almost right on.
    Is genetics a factor? I believe my mother had an operation to relieve this (forgive the spelling-) a simple thoracectomy. She has had cervical discs replaced as well. We are both fairly tall women, I am 5’11”.
    I don’t know much about anything to do with this, that is why it is so nice to find someone with a knowledge of these things. Looking for answers online can scare a girl to death!
    If you like I can keep you posted about his findings.
    Thanks so much again :-)

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8468

    You need to tell him everything you know or can think of when you meet him. After all, he is there to serve you-not the other way around. This is what the history is for in the “history and physical examination. Do not be shy as he needs to hear you and know that you have performed your research.

    Yes, genetics is associated with thoracic outlet syndrome.

    Dr. Corenman

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