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  • srk860
    Participant
    Post count: 19

    I herniated my C5-C6 disc at the end of July. I was really hoping to get endoscopic surgery so I waited to meet professionals who performed that procedure. Because my herniation is in the spine, the consensus is that they want to do a safer anterior approach TDR. (Simplify disc) I have come to terms with this decision. I will be getting the surgery between Dec 23 and Jan 24. (4-5) months of varying pain etc.
    However, during that time, my left arm has become weak, my shoulder, deltoid, and bicep have gotten noticeably smaller. I still have some mobility and I’ve been lifting weights. Raising my arm over my head hurts my axillary nerve area.
    Bottom line, I know my nerve isn’t severed, but it’s been highly compressed for months now. Once I receive a proper decompression, can I get the muscle back, strength, and rotation? I understand I won’t be 100%, but is there a chance hypothetically that the nerve can repair itself after all this time? Ay tips and/or advise would be welcomed.

    Thank you for your time

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8652

    WIth compressed cervical nerve roots, of course faster decompression is always better. However, cervical roots have a better record of recovery than lumbar roots due to their shorter length. Read the two hyperlinks to understand how recovery occurs.

    https://neckandback.com/conditions/how-muscles-recover-from-nerve-injuries-neck/
    https://neckandback.com/conditions/peripheral-nerve-anatomy-neck/

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    srk860
    Participant
    Post count: 19

    First, thank you so much for offering this service and these tools. I read the materials and I have a follow-up request(s).

    1. “Once the nerve is decompressed, the only way to really know about the type of injury is with “tincture of time”.” In your experience, a compressed cervical nerve that causes weakness, is hypothetically most commonly what type of damage?
    2. Am I correct in reading that 1 years/12 months is really the you’ve gone too long mark? If I am at 4-5 months, I am still in that window considering the compression is still there even if the weakness hasn’t gotten better.

    Vr

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8652

    It is hard to know what type of damage is present without sacrificing the nerve for microscopic determination (obviously defeating the purpose). I do think that decompression is important even with prolonged compression as motor strength tends to improve from surgery.

    “Am I correct in reading that 1 years/12 months is really the you’ve gone too long mark”? Not correct. Denervated muscles fibrous at 18-24 months so there is still time for enervation.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    srk860
    Participant
    Post count: 19

    You’ve given me/us hope.

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8652

    Keep in touch to educate the Forum please.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
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