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  • RichNFamus
    Participant
    Post count: 2

    Hi Dr Corenman,

    I know you have previously posted that thoracic vertrebral hemangiomas are typically not pain generators and that they are considered incidental findings on MRI unless they are unusually large or causing a compression fracture or spinal cord compression. However, what does it mean when an MRI report says that there is “edema associated with the hemangioma”? This is at the level of T8. Is this concerning and could it cause pain? If so, what would be the recommended next steps? Thanks.

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8468

    Thoracic hemangiomas should not demonstrate edema normally but there are atypical hemangiomas that can demonstrate a high signal on a STIR image (the imaging study that demonstrates edema). If there is any question, a CT of the area can be helpful.

    Dr. Corenman

    RichNFamus
    Participant
    Post count: 2

    Thanks for your reply, Dr. Corenman.

    Do vertebral hemangiomas have to encompass the entire vertebra to be considered atypical? I can see my hemangiomas on the MRi film; they appear to cover about a quarter of the vertebrae at various levels and do not appear to impinge the spinal cord–but the radiologist stated that there was edema associated with one of them at T8. Is it also possible to have hemagniomas on the sacral wings, and might this cause any type of sciatic pain into the ischium bone and posterior thigh with sitting? I will inquire about having a CT. Thanks again for your expertise; much appreciated.

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8468

    Atypical hemangiomas typically do not fill the entire vertebral body to be considered atypical. The sacrum also can contain hemangiomas. Hemangiomas are typically asymptomatic.

    Dr. Corenman

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