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  • AvatarJR
    Participant
    Post count: 2

    Hello, I had a question about pain Ive had ever since my discectomy surgery.

    Some background to my situation, I had a torn meniscus in my left knee & a herniated disc L5/S1, which was giving me sciatica pain on my right side.

    My primary doctor got a referral to a orthopedic clinic & ordered a MRI. MRI showed that I had a moderate herniation at L5/S1. At this time, the MRI session also showed that I had a meniscus tear in my left knee as I mentioned. The surgeons wanted to take care of the knee first. I got the surgery for my knee & then I had to wait 6 weeks later to have the surgery for my disc herniation. The knee healed up very quickly. But the 6 weeks waiting time for the discectomy was hard to handle.

    The sciatica pain I had pre-surgery was so intense that I couldn’t go to work, stand up, walk, use the bathroom, etc. It was the worst pain I have ever had in my life. The pain was on my right side. Stabbing pain in the buttock, back of thigh & the outside part of my foot was numb. I only felt relief if I laid down. I could sleep fine. But sneezing & coughing would send zingers of pain.

    I had the discectomy surgery on July 2 for the herniated disc at L5/S1. The first week was ok. I did get up & walk for the first time in 2 months. I took everything very very slow. No bending or anything. Log roll out of bed, etc. I had my wife tape my back up with strapping tape to keep me from doing any bad movements. This helped a lot.

    But ever since the surgery the back of my thigh has had pain. Its not the same level as pre-surgery. In weeks 1-6, it would come about with no provocation. An aching pain in the back of my thigh that would eventually go away in about 30min or more. Really had no pain in my back at all. Just some zingers in my buttock ever now & then.

    Since weeks 6, the pain in my thigh would come & go like before. But it will now happen if I sit down for any length of time. At week 6 after my surgery, I went back to work. I got an expensive ergonomic chair hoping that it would help with anything related to my situation.

    I also get pain in my tailbone. Or at least it feels like it is my tailbone. I can squeeze the muscles around the tailbone and it will hurt as well. But lying down or walking around will help relieve it.

    Its been 18 weeks now. I have the same pain in the back of my thigh & tailbone whenever I sit in a chair for more than 15 minutes. The pains will gradually go away if I lay down or walk around. As since surgery, I can walk with no problems. Just when I sit in a chair for any length of time.
    A heating pad seems to help some.

    I just called my surgeon today & asked about getting another MRI just to rule out another herniation. Again, I can walk, stand up, etc. Just sitting causes the pain in my thigh.
    They informed me that they are in the process of getting the MRI approved.
    I hate being so worrisome about all this.
    I didnt know if I am being too overly dramatic about all this.

    thanks for reading my story
    jeff

    AvatarDonald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 7735

    You had a disc herniation at L5-S1 that was surgically removed. You then note; “But ever since the surgery the back of my thigh has had pain. Its not the same level as pre-surgery. In weeks 1-6, it would come about with no provocation. An aching pain in the back of my thigh that would eventually go away in about 30min or more”

    You then note; “Since weeks 6, the pain in my thigh would come & go like before. But it will now happen if I sit down for any length of time”

    Finally:”its been 18 weeks now. I have the same pain in the back of my thigh & tailbone whenever I sit in a chair for more than 15 minutes. The pains will gradually go away if I lay down or walk around”. Nerve tension when sitting that gets better with standing or lying down is consistent with a recurrent disc herniation. A new MRI is a good idea.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    AvatarJR
    Participant
    Post count: 2

    Thank you sir for responding to my story.

    I guess to be honest the thigh pain doesn’t happen every time I sit down.
    Today it was manageable and not nearly noticeable as it has been the day before, I used a heating pad today & sat in a different chair.
    When I do have hamstring pain it pretty much always at a certain location. I can almost draw a circle around it the size of a lime on the back of my thigh.

    Actually Ive had tailbone pain pretty much every time Ive sat down since the surgery. Even on the edge of a bed. Usually I’ll get tailbone pain if Ive been sitting in my ergonomic chair for more than an hour.
    Then like today, I sat in a different chair, I didnt really have any tailbone pain.

    Ive been going to PT for about 5 weeks. Ive been really careful & reluctant to do all the exercises they have asked me to do. During a session at their facility I’m fine & can do everything they want me to do.
    I mentioned to them about the hamstring & tailbone pain that I have sometimes. So they’ve started me on doing hamstring stretches. I can do a straight leg raise to about 75-80 degrees. Pre-surgery, I couldnt do beyond 10-15 degrees without severe pain.

    I’m now worried. I sure don’t want to have to go thru another surgery.
    I’m not an active person by any means (no hiking, jogging, biking, etc) so I have no idea how this even happened to me in the first place.
    This whole situation has been the worst experience Ive ever had.

    Thank you again for reading my story

    AvatarDonald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 7735

    Your new symptom review is more encouraging. Intermittent pain is less likely to be recurrent herniation and could be seroma (a collection of fluid that should absorb over time) or root inflammation which comes after the root is decompressed. Recurrent herniation is however still in the running. Maybe a short course of oral steroids could be helpful.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
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