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  • jonlyn
    Member
    Post count: 3

    Recent MRI results:
    Compared with MR dated 8/6/2013, interval increase in the size
    of the left posterior disc extrusion, and the corresponding
    spinal stenosis, at C4-C5. New patchy hyperintensity in the cord
    at the level of C4 and C5 is suggestive of edema related to cord
    compression. Recommend urgent neurosurgery consult.

    I also have hx: syrinx T3-T6 / 2 mm wide
    2002: c5,6,7 fusion
    2010: L5,S1

    Symptoms: numbness primarily shoulders, chest and rt side, abdomen and extremeties; Rt side (entire) tingling, numb; burning rt foot and outer rt bottom of leg;

    Increased frequency/urgency of bladder; no bowel issues

    all symptoms present since March, 2014

    ? = how urgent is surgery, what are the chances of permanent damage

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8409

    You have a large disc herniation at C4-5 above your fusion from C5-7. This is causing significant spinal stenosis and spinal cord compression with cord injury (“suggestive of edema related to cord compression”).

    The cord is further compressed with neck motion. You need to be placed in a cervical collar now with your head in slight flexion (this is the position of least cord compression). You need a surgical consultation as soon as possible to prevent further cord injury.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    jonlyn
    Member
    Post count: 3

    My case file was sent to Durham, NC VA hospital about 5 hours away. They said I would here something sometime next week. The other concern is I have had 2 episodes of idiopathic pulmonary emboli in the last two years. Thorough testing has been done trying to figure out a cause. Brain MRI is clear. What are the chances the damage is permanent.

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8409

    It is hard to say if there could be permanent damage. Your job right now is to prevent any further damage while you can find a surgeon to help you. If you do not have a physician to see immediately, at least find a soft cervical collar, the foam type at a local pharmacy. When you put it on, wear it backwards (the velcro fastening in the front-not the back). This will cause some neck flexion (forward bending) which is protective to the spinal cord.

    Wear this collar full time (even to bed). Do not try to look up as this action causes neck extension (bending backwards) which can cause further compression of the cord.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    jonlyn
    Member
    Post count: 3

    Ok.. I have c-4 fusion w/cord decompression scheduled for July 18. Neurosurgeon stated we have a 33% chance of either no improvement, improvement or worsening. Shot in the dark in other words.. But, today, I have a lump on the right side of my neck behind my ear and yesterday I started having ringing in my right ear. The ringing is not happening today. I have an unexplainable sensation in my right eye.. nothing irritating or painful just a sensation / no pressure/ no blurring/ no headache. The neck lump is about 2″ wide and 3″ long.. best guess.. not sore, and does not hurt. Ear has a little burning sensation inside.. no fever..
    Is this normal with cervical herniation? Should I call my MD tomorrow? I feel silly with all this but, do not want to minimize anything either..

    I got my records from my C5-C7 fusion of 2002.. I did not realize but, there was spinal cord compression at that time as well. Just FYI

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8409

    This surgery is to prevent future injury to the cord. Even though I tell my patients that this surgery is designed to prevent cord injury, I do see many patients with improvement of their myelopathy after surgery.

    Facial sensations are generally not associated with cord compression as the facial nerves are cranial nerves. Cranial nerves do not exit the skull so spinal cord compression should not affect them.

    It does fit that you have cervical stenosis now as you had the same stenosis at the lower levels in the past. You probably have congenital cervical stenosis (you were born with it).

    Becoming nervous prior to surgery is typical. Nervousness can make us hyper-vigilant. This means that we pick up on some symptoms that we might have that we would have ignored before the neck disorder. This does not mean that these separate symptoms are not of some concern but more likely than not, they are not an issue.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
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