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  • Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8409

    Spend some time on the internet looking up potential doctors to see. The internet ratings are certainly not perfect but at least you can get an idea of how the patients (with some exceptions) feel about this physician. Check to see if this surgeon has written anything and if so, read it. Check the section “Questions to ask your spine surgeon or neurosurgeon” to understand how to interview your potential surgeon.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    john123
    Member
    Post count: 30

    Thank you Dr. Corenman,

    I do not think the mechanics of the surgery are that difficult to understand; you would be amazed with some of the consultations I’ve had.

    I had two surgeons suggest a microdesectomy a lone time ago for me and never even mentioned that I had a pars fracture or a slip.

    When you look up reviews for surgeons, there are almost always a few horror stories about each one and if you ask too many questions during your consult, most surgeons feel that you are going to be a pain to deal with. Its a business for them. They don’t really want to be bothered too much. There should be a better way for patients to track a surgeons results. Its a guessing game for the most part.

    I may be over thinking it at this point, however I have still have not come across one surgeon that I was very confident in. Everything seems like a rush job and the new insurance laws do not seem to help the situation very much…not a lot of happy Dr.s out there and they seem to take it out on their patients.

    Thanks again for your patience and time. It has been very helpful !

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8409

    This is a big problem in my profession. There is too little time to discuss the mechanics of surgery or how the results “could look”. Insurance companies are reducing payments making some surgeons spend even less time with patients. Some surgeons do not want to be bothered with patients that have many questions. To put it frankly, some surgeons do not like face-to-face interaction with patients.

    On the other hand, do you want to go to a surgeon who does not want to spend the time educating you regarding the surgery and potential outcomes? If he or she cannot take 15-20 minutes to discuss surgery (after a thorough history and physical examination), this might not be the surgeon you want taking care of you after surgery.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    john123
    Member
    Post count: 30

    Hi Dr. Corenman:

    Can you please discuss scar tissue/fascia/adhesions after TLIF surgery or ALIF surgery ?

    If there is scar tissue that wraps around nerves or creates muscle spasm what can be done about it ? IS this a common occurrence.

    Thank you

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8409

    Scar tissue always occurs after surgery. Most of the time, the scar formation is minimal and has no bearing on the outcome. There are unusual occasions that scar can form and tether the nerve root. This can induce nerve pain. There is no way to predict beforehand that this scar will occur.

    Scar in the muscle almost never causes long-term pain. If an ALIF surgery is performed, scar can occasionally cause bowel adhesions.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    john123
    Member
    Post count: 30

    Thank you !

Viewing 6 posts - 31 through 36 (of 37 total)
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