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  • Paul
    Member
    Post count: 2

    May 2010 I suffered a lifting injury – back squatting.

    Initial treatment by a physio was done, and was thought to be simply some soft tissue damage.

    It was very painful, a stabbing sensation a T1-T4. No referred pain in arms etc.

    After 3 months of getting nowhere I had an MRI. The report basically says, all clear, normal healthy spine.

    Between then and now Ive scene a thoracic expert and a sports doctor as well. All telling me the same thing, no damage will get better over time.

    A few weeks ago I decided to see a chiropractor to get a different approach to the diagnosis. I showed her my MRI and she noticed that my T1-T2 were very mildly pushed forward, very mildly. I’m not sure if that diagnosis is accurate or not. I can provide the MRI for you to see as well.

    She has been giving me neck strengthening exercises.

    Also, from the time of the injury to even now, I am still deadlifting, pressing and front squatting with no pain. I can pull 200kg off the floor no problem, no pain.

    Im finding the pain tends to start from bad postural position, like sitting at work or laying watching tv in bed. Also not Ive never had postural issues before this injury.

    The upper thoracic does feel somewhat unstable, it clicks and creaks a lot.

    I can go through a few weeks of next to no discomfort then suddenly weeks of pain.

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8376

    Upper thoracic pain is very commonly from cervical spine origin. My first question would be if you have had a cervical MRI.

    The comment from your chiropractor about T1 being “pushed forward” on T2 could be an indication of something called a degenerative spondylolysthesis (see section on neckandback.com). Vertebral slips may not show up on an MRI as you are lying down for the MRI images and the slip may return to normal alignment without the affects of gravity.

    Lifting heavy weights may uncover an instability of the vertebral segments that normally would not have attention paid to it. Do you develop pain immediately during a lifting session or 3-4 hours later? If you don’t lift for 3-4 days, does the pain go away?

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    Paul
    Member
    Post count: 2

    Thanks for the reply

    There does not appear to be any correlation between when the pain begins and my weightlifting.

    I can experience virtually no pain for weeks, during that time I’m lifting heavy three times a week.

    I have not had a cervical MRI, although everyone I have scene has checked my neck.

    I would imagine a slipped vertebrae would cause me pain when I’m lifting heavy objects from the floor, or even overhead.

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8376

    If there is no correlation between the lifting and the pain, then this is not instability and the possibility of a degenerative spondylolysthesis is lessened. I think the next step is to ask you doctor to see if he or she will order an MRI of your cervical spine.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
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