Viewing 4 posts - 1 through 4 (of 4 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • AnnCAndrews
    Member
    Post count: 2

    I was diagnosed last fall with a 1st degree Spondylolithesis at L4 L5. All the information I find on line seems to show and talke about this with the upper part of the spine moving forward and the lower/pelvis portion having slipped back. My spondylolithesis is the opposite with the lower spine having moved forward and the upper spine moving back. There is degeneration present as I am an overweight 51 year old female but it isn’t clear that that is the sole cause of the spondy. My question is simple: I had a surgery 2+ years ago that tacked a prolapsed organ up by tying it to the spinal sheath. My problems bagan in the year after the surgery. Is it reasonable to be concerned that the pull of the tack may be what precipitated condition especially if there may have been an undiscovered underlying condition? What type physician is likely to be able to help me unravel this? My fear is that if I am right and there is a connection, until the tack is reversed the source of the problem will continue and cancel anything I do to try to improve my issue. I have been doing physical therapy which is helping minimally and my symptomolgy includes tolerable pain but also an increasing numbless in my left thigh. The diagnosing physician was in general insensitive to my concerns and I have been trying to figure out what type physician is the best to manage/plan my future and how to treat the spondy. Thank you so much for offering this forum and the potential to get some guidance from someone who I dearly wish was near me. :-)

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8459

    Your condition at L4-5 is called a retrolisthesis and is not associated with tacking the organ sheath to what I imagine is the anterior longitudinal ligament, the ligament that runs along the front of the spine.

    A retrolisthesis occurs from degenerative disc disease. The disc narrows as does all discs with degenerative changes and the loss of height puts more stress on the facets. The facets are like a ramp angled backwards and the loss of height allows the facets to “pull” the upper vertebra backwards.

    This condition can be related with an increased curve in the thoracic spine but usually not only at the L4-5 level, so it is very unlikely that you have that association.

    The standard treatment for degenerative disc disease is what you need right now. This includes a core strengthening program with physical therapy. A good spine rehab doctor like a physical medicine and rehabilitation (PM&R) physician might be a good pick.

    Dr. Corenman

    AnnCAndrews
    Member
    Post count: 2

    Thank you so much for your reply. I will look into one of the local physical medicine and rehabilitation physicians. Is Chiropractic care okay to use as a tool along with this or does the retrospondylothesis make this a bad idea? I had a great chiropractor who is the one that found the retrospondylolithesis initially and wanted me to get an mri and more information from a traditional medical professional before she did anything further. I noticed you have a background with both and figure your answer won’t be biased for or against as some chiropractors or traditional medical professionals’ answers would be.

    Thank you again,

    Ann

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8459

    Chiropractic treatment can work well for this disorder. Your chiropractor is to be commended for seeking out more information regarding this finding.

    Dr. Corenman

Viewing 4 posts - 1 through 4 (of 4 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.