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  • Avatarrunnergirl
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    Post count: 2

    Hi Dr. Corenman!
    I am a 41 year old runner about 4 months post L5 S1 Microdiscectomy- (surgery 8/15/19) –really successful surgery taking the disc extrusion off the nerve. I’ve had a great experience with PT and am back to almost all activities, including trail running 15-20 miles a week with only off/on nerve damage symptoms in my calf/toes that seem to be improving with massage and dry needling in my calf weekly.
    My question: I have had regular chiropractic adjustments over the past 8 years especially postpartum (2 children who are now 5 and 7) I have been told always, as a mother runner- “my hips are out”- I do all the core and side/glute work, but the almost weekly side posture adjustments have always made me feel “right” again and run faster and no issues.
    I have, of course, NOT had these adjustments since my disc herniated followed by the surgery. I am wondering your opinion on when after this surgery on 8/15/19 it would be safe to have the side “pretzel” adjustment again. And/or if you think that my weekly side adjustment of past years could have contributed to my herniated disc. I understand that there are lots of opinions around this and would like to know when you’d recommend patients to be adjusted again after surgery and/or if you would tell them to avoid it going forward.
    Thank you!

    AvatarDonald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 7262

    Manipulation generally should not cause new annular tears but can cause already torn discs to occasionally herniate. Since we know you have a through and through tear of your L5-S1 disc, you need be somewhat cautious of side posture manipulation, at least in the first 6 months after surgery. The risk diminish after that time but don’t totally disappear.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
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