Recovery ACDF vs. PCF

///Recovery ACDF vs. PCF
Recovery ACDF vs. PCF
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  • AvatarAliB
    Participant
    Post count: 1

    Good afternoon,

    I had a C5/6 ADR on 12/31/18 due to a spinal cord compression. That failed and was removed and an ACDF performed on 2/19/19. I have had severe pain since then and flexion/extension xrays in June 2019 revealed too much movement so I was put back into a hard collar for three months. Flexion and extension xrays on 9/11/19 show way too much movement again and absolutely no fusion going on. He say I am “rocking and rolling in there.” He said my ligaments were the loosest he has ever seen. I am now scheduled for a PCF on 11/11/19. How much more difficult is recovery from PCF as opposed to ACDF? I haven’t been able to work since February and wondering how much longer I will be down. Thank you.

    • This topic was modified 1 week ago by Avatar AliB.
    AvatarDonald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 7005

    You had a failed ADR (artificial disc replacement) that was replaced with a fusion (ACDF)- not an uncommon scenario. The ACDF went on to fail also. The choices now are a repeat ACDF with your own bone (ICBG) vs. a posterior fusion at the failed level (or both). Since the original surgeon had a failure of the ACDF, I am sure he or she does not want to repeat that again.

    A posterior cervical fusion (PCF) would then be the next step. This fusion does take about double the time to go on to union (about 3-4 months). Some surgeons will keep you in a collar for that 3-4 months. Depending upon the work you do, you could be out for that period of time.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
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