Viewing 6 posts - 7 through 12 (of 12 total)
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  • Rivervadas
    Participant
    Post count: 26

    Have you ever done a revision from one adr to another adr?
    I have been reading how the M6-c has a better shock absorption ability that the other discs.

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8409

    I think it would be problematic to replace one ADR with another. You are asking for trouble. I would advise a fusion always to revise an ADR.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    Rivervadas
    Participant
    Post count: 26

    I will be going to Stanford for a consult on this. Is it common to still have considerable pain at the 4 month mark post ADR? My surgeon says yes but I’m not so sure.
    Is there much loss of motion with fusion at c6-7?

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8409

    It is distinctly uncommon to have any significant pain in a well working ADR. Motion at C6-7 was probably limited before the ADR and that could have been one of the reasons for failure (if that is even the presenting problem). You can use the flexion-extension films now (you need them) and measure the current motion of C6-7. That will give you an idea of any loss of motion but i expect you have little to no motion at that level now if the disc has failed.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    Rivervadas
    Participant
    Post count: 26

    I was told by my surgeon that my motion in c6-7 is good and I’m probably experiencing muscle pain and it could take up to a year for it to resolve. Does that sound even remotely possible?
    He also said I may also be experiencing “unmasking” from c3-4 which also has a bulge and may require surgery. I do have dieting pain in that region that extends up into the occipital area and down into the base of the neck and the shoulder.

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8409

    “I was told by my surgeon that my motion in c6-7 is good and I’m probably experiencing muscle pain and it could take up to a year for it to resolve. Does that sound even remotely possible”? No. How your surgeon knows that the motion of C6-7 is “good” without flexion/extension films is remarkable. There is a very simple way to know if this level is painful. Bilateral selective nerve root blocks at C6-7 with temporary relief of pain would help yield a diagnosis. See:
    https://neckandback.com/treatments/epidural-injections-and-selective-nerve-root-blocks-diagnostic-and-therapeutic-neck/ and
    https://neckandback.com/treatments/pain-diary-instructions-for-spinal-injections-neck/

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
Viewing 6 posts - 7 through 12 (of 12 total)
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