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  • mesfin
    Participant
    Post count: 1

    Good morning,

    I had a right sciatica about 2 years ago, that responded to conservative testament and epidural injection and now. It is more painful now. Conservative and epidural are not healing now with the severe pain-buttock, thigh, calf and ankle. MRI then and now showed L5-S1 disc protrusion. No nerve deficit on exam both times. Spine doctor discussion who does endoscopic intralaminar microdiscectomy said if he encounters calcification during the surgery, he will not remove the disc instead he only removes other tissues around (bone,ligamnet etc.) to decompress the nerve. He didn’t recommend Ct scan by saying unnecessary radiation exposure. What do you think, should I do CT first just to make sure what I am dealing with or there is another kind of surgery, maybe the regular microdiscectomy that can remove calcified hernias?

    Thanks

    Mesfin

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8652

    I worry about the technique of endoscopic intralaminar microdiscectomy as the visualization of the pathology is not very good and not all results are as good as a microdiscectomy. In addition, the statement “he will not remove the disc instead he only removes other tissues around (bone,ligamnet etc.) to decompress the nerve” sounds not appropriate. The protruding calcified disc is what is displacing the root. Not to remove this offending structure negates the procedure’s effectiveness. I think a microdiscectomy should give you the best benefit.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8652

    I worry about the technique of endoscopic intralaminar microdiscectomy as the visualization of the pathology is not very good and not all results are as good as a microdiscectomy. In addition, the statement “he will not remove the disc instead he only removes other tissues around (bone,ligamnet etc.) to decompress the nerve” sounds not appropriate. The protruding calcified disc is what is displacing the root. Not to remove this offending structure negates the procedure’s effectiveness. I think a microdiscectomy should give you the best benefit.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
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