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  • Holger
    Member
    Post count: 16

    I want to make this short and sweet! I had a bad accident @ work were a big roll up door fell on my lower back propelling me forward into a trailer door. According to my MRI’s, I suffered L4/L5 & L5/S1 herniations and C3/C4 through C7/T1 disc herniations and advance & moderate spinal canal stenosis. I saw a spinal surgeon who explained that I have a lot of pressure on my cervical spinal cord and he recommended to do anterior & posterior surgery asap. He took ample time to explain the MRI results in detail on his monitor and I actually saw the problems myself. After much research, I am now really scared of the pain & possible complications! (sometimes knowing too much may not be such a good thing after all). This doctor is highly rated and is very compassionate and is in business for 27 years so he’s experienced. I’m not sure if this is still the case, but chiropractors & orthopedic surgeons don’t seem to like each other very much and therefore have very different opinions about whether surgery is really the best option. I have a friend who happens to be a chiropractor and he appears to be in this category. Since you know both sides of the fence being a spinal surgeon & chiropractor, I am understating that I am very curious of your opinion & advice. I’m sorry, it turned out not as short & sweet as I had hoped for…

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8460

    I will just cover the cervical topic for now. Spinal cord compression is not something that will go away and needs to be addressed surgically in most patients. I cannot tell you the need for anterior vs. posterior vs. combined surgery without a thorough physical examination and review of the images.

    Your chiropractor is most likely wrong in this case. I would not have neck manipulations at this point as there is danger of cord compromise.

    It sounds like you have found a great surgeon who is experienced and thoughtful. Please let us know your decisions and experience as you go through this process.

    Dr. Corenman

    Holger
    Member
    Post count: 16

    Thank you so much for your quick response!! Your answer gave me some very much needed peace of mind. There is no such thing as minor surgery as it is trauma to the body. I had previously two arthroscopic meniscectomies. At the second procedure, I developed three pulmonary embolisms in my left lung that resulted in hospitalization for one week in ICU. No fun being a pin-cushion and needing warfarin for nine month. This is where my fear stems toward any future need for surgery. Again, thank you very much for your response & I will definitely keep you informed of my experience.

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8460

    Great. Thank you

    Dr. Corenman

    Holger
    Member
    Post count: 16

    I have a history of three blood clots that where located in my right lung after a surgery. I would like to know whether or not to give a patient with a known history of PE a pre-treatment of Coumadin prior to surgery or right after? Should I ask my surgeon? Is that a good or bad idea? What do you think?

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8460

    Having a history of pulmonary embolism does put you at increased risk of reoccurrence. You cannot be pre-operatively anti-coagulated due to the danger of increased bleeding during surgery and the potential for a hematoma in the spinal canal. I normally wait 36 hours before I start an anticoagulant.

    If the potential for abnormal clotting is much greater, you can have something called a “Greenfield Filter” placed into the vena cava. This temporary device will “catch” clots if they form early to prevent the PE that you suffered from.

    Dr. Corenman

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