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  • Evadams29
    Participant
    Post count: 1

    Hi,
    I had laminectomy with coflex placement of L4L5 6 months ago. Since then, and up until last week I had been progressing quite well. I had been doing yoga, hiking, and swimming with little to no pain. Then last week after 2 rather strenuous days at work ( I’m a dialysis nurse and am required to push heavy machines and sometimes lift heavy boxes), I started to have severe pain in the area of the surgery. 8/10. Dr did xray and said everything looked fine. Sent me home to take advil and wear back brace. Since then the pain has gotten worse. Especially at night. Last night I had to crawl to the bathroom in the middle of the night. My question is, at what point should I insist on an mri? At what point is this not just muscular? My pain does not radiate down my leg, but I do have numbness and burning on the outside of my left knee (the left leg was the affected one before surgery).
    Thank yo
    Evelyn Adams

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8652

    I will state up front that I am not a “Coflex” fan. This device is designed to force the vertebral segments into flexion (kyphosis) and does not take care of the problem (stenosis) that this device was designed to handle. Unfortunately, a somewhat common problem with this device is fracture of the spinous processes that the “fins” rest against or erosion of the spinous process bone. When this happens, pain will occur at the site of implant. I would advise a CT scan if the x-rays don’t demonstrate an obvious fracture. You might need to have this device removed.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    Stephenley
    Participant
    Post count: 4

    Hi Evelyn
    Hope you’re well.
    Did you end up having the Coflex removed? If so did it improve your situation?
    I’m asking as I’m in a lot of pain and considering having mine removed.

    Thank you
    Stephen

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