Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 7 total)
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  • Heatleejoy
    Participant
    Post count: 1

    Dr. Corenman

    If someone herniates their disc, to the point that it appears they need surgery, the MRI’s show a diseased collapsing disc, and weakness is present. But that person waits a few months and starts to show pre-surgery improvements. Hypothetically, is the collapsed natural disc that’s smaller than the other disc spaces, but still has some depth left, always better than an artificial disc, and/or in a case like this, could adding the height with the artificial disc be the better option? Is either of these options better for stability at other levels. All presuming the surgery is successful.

    Also, would you put a different disc in a very active athlete than you would in someone that wasn’t? If so, what disc?

    Thank you for the service.

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8652

    The important missing piece is if you have neurological compromise resulting in weakness or severe dysfunction, surgery is required. If the symptoms are improving without neurological compromise, you can wait. Artificial discs can be effective in athletes but can also wear out. Adding height to a disc space can be important to enlarge nerve holes (foramina) if a hole is collapsed.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    srk860
    Participant
    Post count: 19

    Thank you. My husband has dysfunction but the neurosurgeon is wondering if the current primary problem area (shoulder) is a residual affect from the cervical issue. He’s experiencing what appears to be a frozen shoulder/muscle guarding issue and this is the first Dr that’s said the shoulder won’t automatically heal just because you address the neck. That said, there is a large herniation pushing the spine, collapsing the disc space, but is not causing myelopathy.

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8652

    Is the large herniation compressing the nerve root causing shoulder weakness?

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    srk860
    Participant
    Post count: 19

    Yes it appears to be from the scapula side at least.

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8652

    Is weakness present or is it pain only?

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
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