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  • Janieceock
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    Post count: 1

    My husband was in a car accident and he fractured his neck. His neurosurgeon sent him for an mri. He is not really explaining this can you help us understand what this means:

    Reason For Exam
    (MRI Spine Cervical wo Contrast) Other nondisplaced fracture of seventh cervical vertebra,
    Report
    CLINICAL INFORMATION: Other nondisplaced fracture of the seventh cervical vertebra. Neck pain.
    TECHNIQUE: MRI of the cervical spine without contrast.
    COMPARISON: None.
    FINDINGS:
    ALIGNMENT: Normal.
    VERTEBRAE: Vertebral body heights are normal. No suspicious bone marrow signal.
    PERIVERTEBRAL SOFT TISSUES: Normal.
    SPINAL CORD: Mild anterior flattening of the cervical spinal cord at the level of C5-C6 from degenerative disc bulge. No
    evidence for cord edema.
    C2-C3: No central canal or neural foraminal stenosis.
    C3-C4: Disc osteophyte complex is noted partially effacing the anterior subarachnoid space with mild central canal stenosis.
    Bilateral uncinate joint degenerative changes moderately narrows the neural foramina.
    C4-C5: Anterior degenerative osteophyte. Disc osteophyte complex partially effaces anterior subarachnoid space with mild
    central canal stenosis. Bilateral uncinate joint degenerative changes significant narrows the neural foramina with suspected
    encroachment on exiting bilateral C5 nerve roots.
    C5-C6: Disc osteophyte complex is noted effacing the anterior subarachnoid space causing chronic mild anterior flattening of
    the cord at that level with mild to moderate central canal stenosis. Bilateral uncinate joint degenerative changes significant
    narrows the neural foramina with suspected encroachment on exiting bilateral C6 nerve roots.
    C6-C7: Disc bulge partially effaces anterior subarachnoid space with mild central canal stenosis. Bilateral uncinate joint
    degenerative disease narrows the neural foramina with suspected encroachment on exiting bilateral C7 nerve roots.
    C7-T1: Normal.
    IMPRESSION:

    Report
    Multilevel degenerative changes from C3-C4 to C6-C7 as described in detail above with uncinate joint degenerative disease
    and disc osteophyte complex resulting in encroachment on the exiting bilateral C5, bilateral C6 and bilateral C7 nerve roots
    with at most mild to moderate central canal stenosis at C5-C6.

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8652

    Are you sure that your husband fractured his neck as there is no mention of a fracture in the MRI report? There is mention of some “tight” areas that can compress and injure nerve roots and even the spinal cord slightly.
    C3-C4:”Bilateral uncinate joint degenerative changes moderately narrows the neural foramina”. (C4 roots)
    C4-C5: “suspected encroachment on exiting bilateral C5 nerve roots”.
    C5-C6: “suspected encroachment on exiting bilateral C6 nerve roots”.
    C6-C7: “suspected encroachment on exiting bilateral C7 nerve roots”.

    Please refer to this hyperlink to understand what compression to the individual (C4-7) nerve roots will cause in regards to symptoms.
    https://neckandback.com/conditions/symptoms-of-cervical-nerve-injuries/

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
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