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  • betterware
    Member
    Post count: 4

    I had an accident in 2011, whilst lifting gym equipment. Since then I have suffered with chronic pain, specifically in the neck area. Which leaves me bed bound for days. I received an MRI last week on my cervical spine and lumbar spine. I got the results yesterday and am confused as to what they mean. There are some reversal of cervical lordosis on the sagittal images consistent with muscle spasm.Minor to moderate degenerative change identified within the C5-C6 disc space with a minor broad based central and left sided disc bulging at this level without cord compression or nerve root compression. Moderate degenerative change with some narrowing of vertical height of disc space at C6-C7. There is some minor to moderate broad based disc bulging centrally and extending to the right and left of midline at this level without cord compression.Minor bilateral posterior uncovertebral osteophyte formation at this level. there is some loss of lordosis in the distal thoracic and upper lumbar spine consistent with muscle spasm. I am unsure as to what is the best way to move forward from this. What exactly does this mean? And what can I do to help ease the pain? Please help, I am at my wits end with the pain.

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8465

    Chronic neck pain after a lifting accident that has continued for some years is obviously a significant problem. I assume you have axial (central) neck pain and no pain that radiates down below your posterior shoulders (this region is a common referral area for injury to the disc without nerve root compression).

    I will assume that since it has been almost two years since the injury, you have exhausted conservative measures (physical therapy, chiropractic, injection, medications and alternative care). Is this true?

    If every treatment has been ineffective and you have incapacitating neck pain, you might be a candidate for surgical intervention. See the section on “When to have neck surgery” for further details. Read the section regarding degenerative disc disease under the cervical spine section.

    A work-up might include epidural injections or discograms (see those respective sections on the website). Finally, if the diagnosis is made, you might be a candidate for an ACDF (see this under the surgical section).

    Dr. Corenman

    betterware
    Member
    Post count: 4

    I have had physiotherapy and have gotten injections into my spine and shoulder. I got these however before my MRI results so unfortunately have found them of no benefit. I will be going back to the specialist soon to discuss this, and possible injections into my neck. Would you recommend I go to a chiropractor, as it has been something I have thought about. I didn’t find that the physio helped either, or hot or cold treatments, or holistic massage. Thank you so much for taking the time to reply

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8465

    Chiropractic care is something you can try for relief of your symptoms if you have not yet gone down that pathway. In general, if you have no significant narrowing of the spinal canal, no instability and no motor weakness, this condition is obviously painful but not dangerous. It is hard to know what therapy can be effective until you undergo that therapy. If everything treatment method fails to control your symptoms, that is when you can consider if you are a surgical candidate.

    Dr. Corenman

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