Viewing 2 posts - 1 through 2 (of 2 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • summerrose10
    Member
    Post count: 2

    I wrote to you a while ago about my 80 yr old mother who has bilateral calf pain which affects her only when she walks and stops when she rests.
    I want to give you a list of problems from her MRi and i would like,if you can,tell me which one is probably the major cause of her callves hurting?

    1. grade1 anterolisthesis of L3 and L4. Also at L5-S1.
    2. Li-L2 disc herniation.
    3. L2-L3 annular bulging
    .4. L3-L4 larger central disc herniation and annular tear.Hypertropic changes are noted in facets and flava.Central canal stenosis at this level of probable moderate to severe.
    5. L4-L5 mild stenosis and disc herniation.
    6 L5-S1 multilevel facet arthosis.Left greater than right neural foraminal stenosis.

    whatever you can see would be helpful.

    thank you.

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8378

    Remember that the probable source of your mother’s pain is canal narrowing or spinal stenosis. An anterolysthesis in the radiologist’s eyes is most likely a degenerative spondylolysthesis. These two levels at L3-4 and L5-1 are therefore more likely to be associated with stenosis (see section of degenerative spondylolysthesis on the web site).

    The radiologist mentions L3-4 where the “Central canal stenosis” is moderate to severe. He also mentions L5-S1 where foraminal stenosis is significant. Your mother’s symptoms could be from either level but foraminal stenosis causes lep pain in a specific pattern and not a general bilateral pattern. More likely than not, the stenosis at L3-4 is where the pain is generated.

    Good Luck

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
Viewing 2 posts - 1 through 2 (of 2 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.