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  • Leanie
    Member
    Post count: 2

    I had a MRI this year and the only thing my GP keeps telling me is I have Osteoarthritis but I would like to understand more of what’s going on. I was diagnosed with Notalgia Parasthetica last year in my right shoulder blade. The bottom tip of my right shoulder blade hurts horrible sometimes, stabbing pains and sometimes of my left arm will hurt like a tootach and my fingers will swell. Here is my results, also xrays showed degenerative changes in both hips.
    C4-C5 no disc protrusion, spinal stenosis or neural foranimal narrowing. Mild bilateral apophyseal joint hypertrophy.
    C5-C6 Broad based central disc osteophyte complex. Flattening of the ventral thecal sac. No spinal stenosis or cord compression. Mild bilateral apophyseal joint foraminal narrowing.
    C6-C7 Central disc osteophyte complex. Deformity of thecal sac without spinal stenosis or cord compression. Mild apophyseal joint hypertrophy and uncovertbral joint hypertrophy without significant neural foraminal narrowing.
    Thoracic Spine:
    There are multiple right renal cortical T2 hyperintensities which most likely represent renal cortical cysts. Recommend confirmation with ultrasound. Three lesions are demonstrated by this study. The largest measures 1.4CM. It should be noted that kidneys are incompletely visualized on this examination.

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8652

    I am unclear what disorder “Notalgia Parasthetica”is as it is a foreign phrase to me.

    Your symptoms of “bottom tip of my right shoulder blade hurts horrible sometimes” and “stabbing pains and sometimes of my left arm will hurt like a tootach” could indicate a shoulder disorder like a rotator cuff tear or could indicate cervical nerve root compression.

    Your MRI does have some findings of C6 nerve compression (“Mild bilateral apophyseal joint foraminal narrowing”) as one mans “mild” is another mans “moderate”.

    Your best opportunity for diagnosis is a through history and physical examination by a knowledgeable spine surgeon (not neurosurgeon) and allow this individual to also go through your images.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    Leanie
    Member
    Post count: 2

    Thank you very much for answering back. I was diagnosed by a dermatologist and my GP that I have notalgia…here is what it is actually is:
    Notalgia paresthetica (NP) is a sensory neuropathic syndrome of the mid back skin, the classic location of which is the unilateral infrascapular area. Notalgia paresthetica is primarily a localized pruritus syndrome, but it may present with episodic itching or pain on a small patch of the mid back, usually an area of skin just past easy reach. NP is very common; however, it remains heavily underrecognized and largely underdiagnosed. Notalgia is described in a very high association with radiographically documented cervical spinal disease. Even in the absence of radiographic findings, nearly all NP patients have a history of neck pain, painful neck muscle spasm, asymptomatic neck spasm, interscapular pain, arthritis, and neck injuries.

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8652

    This disorder is related to puritis (itching) and not pain. Pain in this region probably has a different origin than a local sensory nerve injury.

    Here is the rub. “Notalgia is described in a very high association with radiographically documented cervical spinal disease”. Why would this be? The reason is simple. Notalgia paresthetica is the description of symptoms without a cause. The cause in this case is referral pain from a degenerative disc but whomever put this term together did not know the connection.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
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