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  • mbudman
    Member
    Post count: 3

    Dear Dr. Corenman,

    I was reading a post from another of your forum members and I als would like to congratulate on the information and resources regarding back issues.

    I had an MRI completed yesterday, and my doc (specialist) is leaving for vacation for two weeks. On top of that my GP is also on vacation for two weeks. With no one available to explain the results and interpret my scans, I am left in a state of limbo.

    My situation is unique as I had surgery for Ulcerative colitis in 1984. In the surgery, the colon was removed and a “j” pouch was created. I have been having (2+ years) a wide range of issues (difficulty with bowel movements and horrible nausea are examples of some symptoms).

    My surgeon sent me for a battery of tests and it hasd been determined that my pouch is extremely large and overstretched. The prognosis is to do bowel reconstruction (cut out existing pouch and rebuild with remaining bowel.

    I am experiencing horrible lower back pain. I can sit and lye down without pain. Standing and walking cause at times horrible spasms in my lower back (no where else) and a pain level of 10. Fortunately, sitting or lying down ease the pain.

    I think the pain is a result of my intestine pushing against a nerve.

    Is there a way you could take a look at my MRI data and let me know if you see any reason for the pain?

    How can I get the image data to you? I have full access to a wide range of computer resources, so getting the files to you should not be an issue.

    Any assistance would be appreciated.

    Thanks in advance.

    Best Regards,

    Mark

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8468

    Ulcerative colitis can cause a syndrome called reactive spondyloarthropathy. This is an inflammation of the spine that can cause significant back pain. I will tell you that most individuals with ulcerative colitis do not develop this additional syndrome but it has to be ruled out in your situation.

    Lower back pain generally is not caused by a “pinched nerve”. The source is typically from the disc or facet.

    You can call the office and have copies your images sent by FedEx. The number is (970) 476-1100. You can send by open source email but that is not anonymous.

    Dr. Corenman

    mbudman
    Member
    Post count: 3

    Dear Dr. Corenman,

    I would be happy to send the information via email. How do I do that and to who do I direct the information to?

    Thank you so very much.

    Best Regards,

    Mark

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8468

    I cannot tell you how to transmit your films. Most individuals send me a DVD of the films.

    Dr. Corenman

    mbudman
    Member
    Post count: 3

    Dear Doctor,

    Would it be possible to tell me what information can be gathered from an MRI?

    I understand that it could reveal the following:

    1. Herniated disc
    2. Pinched nerve

    Is there anything else? What about muscle strain?

    Would it be able to show if a part of my intestine was pushing against something causing pain in the lower back?

    I am in horrible pain and went to emergency. I get these awful (pain level 10) spasms based on movement. Fortunately the pain subsides, but it is unbearable when it hurts. Emergency docs did not think it is a pinched nerve, nor do they think I have a herniated disc. All they did was prescribe narcotic pain medicine.

    Thanks in advance,

    Mark

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8468

    MRIs reveal the current state of the bone, disc, nerves, facets and cord. There is some peripheral information such as kidneys, uterus, aorta and colon but this is not a good study to use for diagnosis of those structures.

    Intestines do not have enough mass to push against and affect the psoas muscle which contains the femoral and sciatic nerve plexuses. Pain in the back can originate from structures in the retroperitoneum (this is the membrane that contains the intestines). See “mimics of lower back pain” in my consumers book for a full explanation.

    Dr. Corenman

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