Microdisectomy and calf pain

///Microdisectomy and calf pain
Microdisectomy and calf pain
Viewing 2 posts - 1 through 2 (of 2 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • Avatarcaritrueb@
    Participant
    Post count: 1

    Hello,
    Thanks in advance for reading this. I had a microdisectomy of my L5S1 about 8 weeks ago. I healed well from the surgery and followed all the instructions. The only thing I am having an issue with is my calf. When I wake up my left leg feels great. But once I step foot on the ground I feel shocks in my calf. My surgery was with a spinal surgeon but when I called the recommended I follow up with an ortho. I did. We found that I lost my Achilles reflex and have a lot of tightness in my ankle. For the most part I am walking with a limp due to my calf being cramped. He performed nerve testing and believes I have a disruption in my sacral nerve. He recommended I increase gabapentin which I have although it’s not improving. Is it just too soon or should I call my surgeon back and ask for another MRI? Could my Sacral root still be compressed? I have tried PT but it didn’t seem to improve at all.

    AvatarDonald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 7138

    The aftermath of nerve injury from disc herniations for the first 3-6 months can be “tightness in my ankle” and “walking with a limp due to my calf being cramped”. The nerve needs to heal and if a large herniation compression occurred, that takes time. The L5-S1 level is generally associated with the S1 nerve which is of course a “disruption in my sacral nerve”. Possibly, a short course of oral steroid would be appropriate, If symptoms don’t improve in 3-4 weeks, a new MRI should be considered,

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
Viewing 2 posts - 1 through 2 (of 2 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.