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  • AvatarJames 1
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    Post count: 3

    I’m 38 and have recently been diagnosed with having a cervical osteophyte im down for c5, c6,c7 acdf. Have worked with power tools and heavy manual lifting for past 25 years. Is this likely to have caused the osteophyte? The position my neck is put in using these tools is exactly where the osteophyte is causing issues.
    Going forward after op is it safe to continue these activities or is it likely to place added stress on the surrounding areas.

    AvatarDonald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 7794

    Osteophytes are caused by degeneration of the discs and facets which is very common in almost everyone alive (eventually). Some individuals develop these spurs at age 30 and many by age 60. If there is no neck pain, spinal cord compression or nerve root compression, they mean nothing. Do not change your activity levels unless you have the above noted symptoms.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    AvatarJames 1
    Participant
    Post count: 3

    Thankyou for replying. I have seen my second mri met with my surgeoun yesterday. I have just noticed that It looks like a similar situation at the bottom of my neck with a bone spur growing and pushing into my disc. My surgeoun never mentioned this how can I post a picture?

    Hes only going to operate on my c5 c6 c6 c7 this time round. Using a titanium cage as opposed to a bone graft. Does this sound normal to you ? I was under the impression a bone graft is way forward

    AvatarDonald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 7794

    Surgical indications are symptoms from nerve compression, deformity, spinal cord compression and neck pain not controlled and causing significant dysfunction. Having “bone spurs” without the indications noted would not justify surgery so I expect you have significant symptoms. It sounds like you are slated for an ACDF at C5-6 and C6-7 with titanium cages. Titanium cages work well as they are “friendly” to bone ingrowth but I don’t personally like them as being made of metal, they obscure bone growth on X-ray and can obscure future MRI findings.

    Your choices of graft include your own (ICBG), allograft (donor bone) which I have drifted away from as the grafts are inconsistent, PEEK cages (plastic) which I have resisted in the past but have found that with titanium sintering (titanium coating driven into the plastic), they are very bone compatible and much easier to use that your own bone graft from the hip (ICBG). ICBG however is the gold standard with the fastest and best fusion rates with the penalty of an incision and discomfort from the graft site.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    AvatarJames 1
    Participant
    Post count: 3

    Thankyou for taking the time in replying, and explaining this can I ask you to take a look at my mri scan and. I cant see where I can upload the picture. Can I contact you another way ?

    AvatarDonald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 7794

    I have a program called a “long-distance consultation” (LDC) where for a fee, I review all your films and your written history (which you fill out) and personally give you a phone call that lasts 20-40 minutes. I then give suggestions as to future treatments and any further tests that could be necessary. Contact the office at the number above for further information.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
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