Viewing 6 posts - 7 through 12 (of 19 total)
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  • Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8409

    The epidural injections should be relatively minimally uncomfortable if performed by a meticulous and considerate injectionist. Good luck with your treatment.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    hrosatelli
    Member
    Post count: 11

    Thank you, you have been a big help. I just got one more question: Why does my lower back cause my left hip, buttock, leg and foot to hurt so badly? I just do not understand, the neuro surgon said he does not see a pinched nerve, so if its not a pinched nerve what else could cause it, hmmmm. thank you

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8409

    Your MRI report note multiple areas where you have a “pinched nerve” on the left. “L4-5: Thickening of ligamentum flavum and facet capsular tissue with mild left subarticular and left foraminal narrowing” as reported by the radiologist.

    Commonly with degenerative scoliosis, there will be foraminal collapse. The foramen is made up by the two adjacent vertebra. If the vertebra are parallel to each other, the foramen is rarely compromised. However, if the adjacent vertebra are angulated greater than 6 degrees to each other (very common in degenerative scoliosis), the foramen will be significantly narrowed (see website for details). When you then stand up, this further narrows the foramen as the diameter of this opening narrows with extension (bending backwards) which is a component of standing up.

    This problem is better appreciated on the standing front to back X-ray and not necessarily on the MRI. The question then; is your pain in your leg worse with standing (and walking) but improved with sitting down or crouching/ leaning forward like when you hold onto a shopping cart?

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    hrosatelli
    Member
    Post count: 11

    The pain in my leg worsens upon standing, I can stand for maybe ten to fifteen minutes and I have to sit down and get off of it, I have caught myself leaning forward at times, and yes when I am shopping I do lean on the cart, but when I get to the check out stand I try to find the shortest line cuz my leg just does not like standing too long at a time.

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8409

    You have typical foraminal stenosis from a collapsed foramen due to degenerative scoliosis. You can try to get some relief from a selective nerve root block (SNRB- see website) as this injection may give longer term relief. I predict that you will consider surgery for relief sooner than later.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    hrosatelli
    Member
    Post count: 11

    I do thank you for all your help. The neuro surgeon I seen suggested a back brace or corset, I am just wondering if that will actually help me. I would hate to spend the money on one and it not help.

    Thank you
    Helen Rosatelli

Viewing 6 posts - 7 through 12 (of 19 total)
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