Viewing 4 posts - 1 through 4 (of 4 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • EByrdTN
    Member
    Post count: 2

    Dr. Corenman,

    Thank you in advance for your time.

    I think at this point that I may have 4 bulging discs.

    1). T11-12: Sagittal inmages show minimal posterior disc bulging and osteophyte formation. Minimal facet arthropathy.

    2). L2-3: Mild posterior disc bulging with minimal indentation on the thecal sac. Mild facet joint arthropathy noted bilaterally. There is a tiny amount of fluid in the left facet joint.

    3). L3-4: There is a left foraminal annular fissure and small protrusion which narrows the caudal aspect of the neural foramen. No nerve root displacement. The central canal is widely patent. Mild to moderate facet joint arthropathy. Small amount of fluid on right facet joint.

    4). L4-5: There is posterior disc bulging with superimposed right paracentral/foraminal disc protrusion. This could impinge the right intrathecal L5 nerve root. Additionally, there is severe bilateral facet joint arthropathy. No fluid is seen within the facet joints. At least mild bilateral foraminal stenosis is evident because of facet joint arthropathy. There is mild anterolisthesis of L4 on L5.

    5). L5 S1: Posterior disc bulging indents the thecal sac. No nerve root displacement. Mild facet joint arthropathy and mild neural foraminal narrowing..

    This was on MRI in October of 2013. I was never told about the T11-12 results. Also in January of this year I had a CT scan with dye done to rule out a stroke and just recently found I had C4-5 and C5-6 anterolisthesis. I have had mornings when I wake up and both arms will be numb and I have to rub my neck before I can raise up in bed, at those times it feels like my neck will just snap. With the anterolisthesis in the lumbar region feels like there is a big pinch and sometimes I feel like I’ve been cut in half.

    Would you please explain this to me?

    Again, thank you in advance for your time.

    Elizabeth

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8652

    You have degenerative spondylolistheses at multiple levels in the cervical and lumbar spines. Please read these sections on the website to understand the symptoms that can be generated.

    You have some compression of the nerves also. This could lead to buttocks and leg symptoms. See the section on “Symptoms of lumbar nerve injuries” to understand what these symptoms could entail.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    EByrdTN
    Member
    Post count: 2

    Again, thank you so much for your time. Am I correct in reading that I have four bulging discs?

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8652

    You are correct. Do not focus on this. It is just that your genetics are such that your collagen fibers that make up the disc wall (annulus) are more “brittle” and you suffer more tears. I call this CBS (crappy back syndrome) and it is not a big deal unless these discs become symptomatic. I cannot tell you how many patients I see that have this with little or no symptoms (they come in with other problems and CBS is found as a side-note).

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
Viewing 4 posts - 1 through 4 (of 4 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.