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  • AvatarDonald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 7481

    Get some lab tests to make sure you don’t have an infection (unlikely). You could have a seroma (a collection of fluid) or rarely, the decompressed level could have collapsed and you now have foraminal stenosis. A standing X-ray would be helpful to rule that condition out. MRI would rule out a seroma which could be aspirated if necessary.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    AvatarMidwestW
    Participant
    Post count: 14

    Thanks. Called and my surgeon ordered a Medrol pack and told me to rest. I mentioned your advice and was told they would recommend those tests if no relief from steroids.

    I understand that inflammation can occur after discectomy due to the nerve handling (I have had one of those before), but can it also happen with laminectomy with no disc work? My symptoms are in the exact same pattern as pre op, and a little bit worse after having had a few days of relief post op.

    AvatarDonald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 7481

    It is unusual but not unheard of to have increased symptoms due to nerve root manipulation (you have to retract the nerve to get to the spur and ligament) but this should calm down in short order. Hopefully the steroid will cool off the nerve root and your concerns.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    AvatarMidwestW
    Participant
    Post count: 14

    Hi. As an update–I’m 3 weeks post laminectomy (no discectomy or fusion) for lateral recess stenosis. I took the steroids and had a benefit in reduced leg pain. However, I continue to have deep, deep back pain that sometimes goes into my butt and hip. It is made much worse by walking. Sitting/lying down for a couple hours makes it much better. Is this typical after laminectomy, this much back pain three weeks out? It behaves just like my pre-op stenosis did (worse walking, better sitting or lying down), which concerns me.

    AvatarDonald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 7481

    It is unusual but not unheard of to develop lower back pain after a lateral recess decompression without discectomy. The facet is trimmed during the procedure and can compress (collapse) upon itself with the increased bony pressure causing deep bone pain. Generally, this symptom should abate from 4 weeks to 6 months.

    Now, there always is the possibility that this collapse can recurrently impinge the nerve root causing the same pain as before but give this at least 4 more weeks with physical therapy before you look further.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    Avatarwmiller
    Participant
    Post count: 26

    Thank you. I spoke to my surgeon today (virtual appt given COVID19), and told him about it and that I also have some continued sciatica. He said the same thing–give it four more weeks. I see him in the office then (if all this has stopped by then).

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