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  • Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8455

    One image is not enough to understand the anatomy. Also, there is a bulge but not a frank herniation in that one picture.

    Dr. Corenman

    Bikingenjo
    Participant
    Post count: 14

    Managed to get their analysis back – seems like you’re right, it’s just a bulge. What’s your interpretation of the below results? I’m not sure what they mean by soft tissue defects, could that be the source of the nerve sensation I have at L5S1?

    L5-S1: Left hemilaminectomy and discectomy. Mild retrolisthesis with a small broad-based disc bulge and mild neuroforaminal narrowing. No significant Central spinal canal stenosis or nerve root compression. There soft tissue along the left hemilaminectomy defect consistent with postoperative change/scar..

    IMPRESSION: MRI of the lumbar spine demonstrates:

    Left laminectomy and discectomy at L5/S1 without evidence of recurrent disc herniation. Soft tissue along the left laminectomy defect, likely scar/postoperative change.
    2. Mild retrolisthesis of L5 on S1 with loss of disc space height

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8455

    “Soft tissue defects” is most likely scar formation which takes up space and can cause problems either from tethering the movable nerve root or displacing it causing compression. it is difficult to treat surgically.

    Dr. Corenman

    Bikingenjo
    Participant
    Post count: 14

    Thank you – are there non surgical ways to treat it then (or is it something that gets better with time)?

    For what it’s worth, and for any other readers, my pain has gotten substantially better in the last few weeks. I am about 2.5 months post op and I am able to bike 20 miles per day, light running, and rowing without any major consequence. Athletically, I feel nearly back to normal. But I do have some minor annoyance while sitting still – hopefully that gets better

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8455

    It can get better with time (6 months). Epidural steroid injections can be effective too. A redo surgical decompression has about a 50% chance for some improvement but the skills to remove adhesions are in the hands of very few surgeons.

    Dr. Corenman

    woodlawn1
    Participant
    Post count: 6

    [quote quote=35355]It can get better with time (6 months). Epidural steroid injections can be effective too. A redo surgical decompression has about a 50% chance for some improvement but the skills to remove adhesions are in the hands of very few surgeons.[/quote]

    Not to interject, but I had a lumbar fusion a year or so ago with one of those few surgeons, and I cannot stress enough how much of a difference it made. I am entirely pain free and cleared to jump out of airplanes (not that I want to, however).

    I would name the surgeon, but am not sure that’s allowable here.

Viewing 6 posts - 7 through 12 (of 27 total)
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