Viewing 3 posts - 7 through 9 (of 9 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • gu2002
    Member
    Post count: 5

    Thanks for the reply! Now I want to ask if you believe that because of my age (43) years and really physically active (or to do a lot of sports) further surgery is warranted? considering that the pain is tolerable from the intake of analgesics, or I can do some activity like swimming or biking or elliptical to strengthen my abdominal muscles and lower back especially. and if this activity can actually damage or increase damage to the L5-S1 disc space.
    from already thank you very much for your answers, it is important to have another look the same problem!

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8409

    This is a decision that you alone have to make. If you can tolerate the symptoms and participate in your life activities without any significant restrictions without aggravating symptoms, then you don’t need to consider surgery. If the symptoms “get in your way”, then you need to consider surgery. You have to weigh the benefits of surgery (decompression of the nerve root and hopeful relief of pain) against the risks of surgery. Your age is in the typical range for these problems but does not by itself matter in the equation.

    Again, the indications for surgery for a disc herniation are cauda equina syndrome (you do not have this), muscle weakness (you report you do not have this) and pain that is not tolerated. The last indication you will notice is a value judgment by you alone. Do you feel that you want relief and are willing to undergo surgery with the attendant risks?

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    gu2002
    Member
    Post count: 5

    Dr again thanks for your reply, I agree with your assessment, is that by the time my pain is tolerable and even though I am not physically active, I will start doing to try to strengthen the areas needed and see what happens then the reality is that I do not want to go through another surgery, while you can bear the pain and discomfort that sometimes I have.
    Thanks again and keep in touch, hoping that science and technology advancement in the field of interventions and replacement discs surgically, to avoid more problems in the future the affected area!

Viewing 3 posts - 7 through 9 (of 9 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.