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  • Avatarppower
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    Post count: 2

    Dr Corenman I am 61 years old and in good health I had a right sided micro discectomy on the 3rd of Feb this year. Prior to this I was in the gym 5 days a week. No sudden injury it just appeared I imagine through years of micro trauma

    I am now 8 weeks into my recovery and still have right leg pain. I am walking 1 to 2 miles daily and this causes general hip aches, buttock, back of leg and outside calf pain. This I think is just my body getting used to walking again. All pain is releived if I lie flat with knees bent similar as to before my op.

    If I turn in bed I also get what I can only describe as a slight electric shock in my right buttock which then causes a general ache in the back of my right leg. Seems any stretching of the nerve causes discomfort.

    I am doing physio exercises every day and can do straight leg raises to about 75 degrees with no sharp shooting pain just a stiffness in my hamstrings.

    By the way my hamstrings have always been tight even before this.

    The following is what is puzzling me.
    If I sit upright in a straight backed dining chair and extend my left leg straight from the knee it generates pain in my right leg from my buttock to my outer calf. If I then raise my right leg it generates the same pain but with less intensity.

    This is not a sharp pain more of an ache which can then linger for 30 to 60 minutes. Also find the same pain if I stand on one leg and swing the other back and forward.

    It is worse in the morning and if I work through the pain by doing repetitions it does ease.

    Is this just still inflammation of the nerve, morning stiffness and will it ease. Puzzled as to why I have this pain pattern.

    I also have a degenerated and thinning disc at L5-L4 with end plate reactions. Could this now be contributing to my pain given the herniated disc has been removed from the nerve.

    I am improved but just concerned that this may be as good as it gets after 8 weeks.

    AvatarDonald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 7481

    You are still healing but your symptoms are greater at this point than would be expected. You still have a tension sign (“extend my left leg straight from the knee it generates pain in my right leg from my buttock to my outer calf. If I then raise my right leg it generates the same pain”) which means continued nerve inflammation. Without fevers and chills, the next step would be an oral steroid. If that is ineffective, then a new MRI and X-rays to look for foraminal collapse or seroma/recurrent disc herniation.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    Avatarppower
    Participant
    Post count: 2

    Thank you so much for your reply. Could you give me an indication of
    A. Steroid used
    B. Dosage
    C. For how long

    Best Regards
    James Brand

    AvatarDonald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 7481

    There are two choices for steroid use. One is a Medrol dose-pack which is as directed on the box and the other is Decadron 4mg twice a day for 5 days. I prefer the Decadron but the dose-pack is acceptable.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
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