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  • Svanl
    Member
    Post count: 2

    Dr. Corenman,

    My daughter is 17 and this is her 3rd year of rowing. She developed lower back pain about 4 months ago which was diagnosed after MRI as L5 S1 disk protrusion. She has been in physical therapy for 3 months, and was feeling much better – she had no pain. Unfortunately the pain came back after she recently tried to row on water (but not during rowing). How can she determine when it is safe for her to start rowing again? Is it possible for you to say what part of rowing movement could cause the injury?

    Thank you.

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8378

    Rowing or crew sports with back pain in a teenager always makes me think of a spondylolysis due to the repetitive extension in the sport. Make sure on the MRI that there is not an unrecognized spondylolysis.

    If the pain is not from a spondylolysis but from the degenerative segment, the pain could originate from the disc or the facet. Does the pain become worse with flexion (bending forward) at the initiation of the stroke or with extension (bending backwards) during the power portion of the stroke?

    She may be a candidate for facet injections (see website for this). More rehab with focus on strengthening extensor muscles and increasing range of motion in extension may be helpful. Possibly an epidural injection may give relief.

    Dr. Corenmna

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    Svanl
    Member
    Post count: 2

    Yes, now I remember that during the MRI review appointment the doctor mentioned the fracture, but said that it is too small to cause pain. Could it be a sign of spondylolysis?

    Would the physical therapy and treatment be different in this case?

    Thank you.

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8378

    If there is a fracture of the pars interarticularis, then your daughter most likely has spondylolysis and the fracture is causing the pain. This would change the treatment as extension loads the fracture and makes the pain increase. She would have to change her rowing style to prevent full extension at the end of the stroke.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
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