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  • glensel
    Member
    Post count: 1

    I had an MRI done 2 dys ago for lower back pain. The results showed Focal posteromedial annular bulge indenting the thecal sac, with mild facet joint hypertrophic changes, mild to moderate right exit foraminal narrowing with an existing nerve irritation. Moderate disc dessiccative changes.
    Please explain what this mean.

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8377

    I can explain the findings on the MRI but these must be correlated to your symptoms. Many times, there are findings on MRI that are irreverent.

    “Focal posteromedial annular bulge indenting the thecal sac” is a disc posterior wall tear and a bulge of this wall. This bulge touches the sac which contains the nerves but does not compress the nerves.

    “With mild facet joint hypertrophic changes” means the facet joints in the back of the vertebra have some degenerative changes.

    “Mild to moderate right exit foraminal narrowing with an existing nerve irritation” simply means that the exit hole for the nerve root is narrowed. Irritation of the nerve can not reliably be seen on MRI so I am unclear why that was noted unless the nerve root is swollen but this radiologist does not say that.

    “Moderate disc dessiccative changes” simply means the disc has lost water content and the disc appears darker on the images than normal.

    All of these problems are explained in the website if you look under lumbar discs, facets and foraminal stenosis.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
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