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  • RJT
    Participant
    Post count: 3

    HISTORY:
    Hello Sir, I’ve had back surgery after it was found my backbone was melting(part of D12, L1 and L2) due to Pott’s spine. Total 3 surgeries were done, one of back where it was about to break and they used plate and wire to support my back in 2007 and 2 other to surgeries were of my stomach from where pus was drained around 1.5 liters. My 4th surgery was done in 2010 because my back implant had started causing infection so they had to remove implants. Now my d12, l1 and have completely fused.
    PROBLEMS:
    1. From several years I’ve been suffering from constipation which is still increasing. I had consulted gastro doctors. They have performed several procedures such as colonoscopy, anorectal manometry, barium defecography, biofeedback, etc but none of them helped or found anything.
    2. I have to use some power while emptying my bladder. Procedures done by uro doctors were urine culture, abdomen ultrasound, uroflowmetry, rgu/mcu xray, uds. Doctor diagnosed nurogenic bladder as it was found that bladderneck is not opening properly.
    3. Minor jolt like in left leg, some part of left leg skin sensation is gone. Waist pain most of the time and sometimes its unbearable and Kyphosis. Doctors gave some medicines like zosert 50, anxit 0.25, etc. He also advised me to do spinal extension exercises 3 reps, 3 times per day. Until now nothing had helped. Doctor also said spine fixation surgery is not a guarantee that it will fix my problem since nothing conclusive was found in mri so I’m still waiting for medicines to work.
    MRI REPORT Impression:
    “1. Complete fusion of the D12, L1 and L2 vertebral bodies resulting in a gibbus deformity and causing indentation over the conus medullaris as described.
    2. Mild disc bulges at L4-L5 and L5-S1 as described.”

    Please share your review regarding my case. Also if surgery is required please tell what will be the best way to do it.
    Thanks

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8652

    You note “Complete fusion of the D12, L1 and L2 vertebral bodies resulting in a gibbus deformity and causing indentation over the conus medullaris as described”.

    Tuberculosis (Pott’s Disease) causes erosion of the front of the spine allowing the spine to “get stuck” in the bent forward position (Kyphosis or Gibbus formation). This “bent forward” position tethers the end of the spinal cord (the conus medularis) and causes malfunction of bowel, bladder and leg nerves (“Minor jolt like in left leg, some part of left leg skin sensation is gone. Waist pain most of the time… suffering from constipation which is still increasing…Doctor diagnosed neurogenic bladder as it was found that bladder neck is not opening properly”).

    While no guarantees are available from surgery results, it would seem that the better chance of having a more reasonable life might be an osteotomy and refusiom of your deformed thoracolumbar spine. A surgery here is not without some significant risk due to scarring. Try and find a major university program who would agree to see you.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    RJT
    Participant
    Post count: 3

    Thanks a lot for reviewing my case Sir. I’ll follow your suggestion!

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8652

    Please keep the forum in touch with your progress.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    RJT
    Participant
    Post count: 3

    My current doctor who is Neurosurgeon said that surgery in this case is very risky which doesn’t guarantee helping in my constipation and bladder problem because Myelopathy and nerve compression could not be seen in mri. So the safest route of surgery could be just straightening of spine with medical hammer and other tools and then use titanium rods to fix the position of spine. Osteotomy is very risky in my case since I already went through spine surgery twice and the nerves around spine maybe glued around my spine due fusion of bones. Sir what should be correct procedure in my case? Thanks for your reviews Sir.

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8652

    Your surgeon is correct regarding the dangers of straightening the kyphosis with the prior infection and surgeries. There is no guarantee that surgery will return your lost function and complications can and do occur. If however, your surgeon is not experienced with osteotomy, he or she might not be the person to see. Maybe a second opinion would be helpful.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
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