Is a Torn Alar ligament bad?

///Is a Torn Alar ligament bad?
Is a Torn Alar ligament bad?
Viewing 6 posts - 19 through 24 (of 24 total)
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  • AvatarDonald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 6759

    One of the problems with the occiput-C1 injuries is that it is very difficult to verify that these ligament injuries cause the pain the patient is experiencing. Normally, a physician can anesthetize any particular structure to temporarily “numb” the structure to look for temporary pain relief. You cannot “numb” this area as anesthesia of the base of the skull could cause loss of breathing and death.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    AvatarRfisher983
    Participant
    Post count: 1

    Hello, In your opinion could having a torn alar ligament and a rotated axis cause ear fullness, pulsating tinnitus and tensor tympani syndrome and affect one ear only?

    Is it possible that the torn alar can cause Eustachian tube dysfunction w/o any fluid in the ear or signs of ear barotrauma?

    -Rob

    AvatarDonald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 6759

    It would be remotely possible but unlikely that your unilateral symptoms could be from a torn alar ligament.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    Avatarmedicalgen
    Participant
    Post count: 11

    Hi Dr Corenman, I havent spoken to you for a while, hope you are keeping well. I would like to know more about the clivo-axial angle if possible. My sinuses have been shot through since my fall. You know the saying ‘to every action there is an equal and opposite reaction’ well the clivo axial angle has to drop somewhere doesn’t it? And if it pulls away steeper from the brainstem causing deformative stress, then could it be putting pressure on other structures when the angle drops. I say this because my turbinates (I’m pretty sure its my turbinates) which have throbbed ever since my fall. It feels like something is pushing into them from further back in my head. Sometimes I have watery and bloody discharge coming down my nose. Its just a theory. Would love to hear your comments.

    AvatarJasper175
    Participant
    Post count: 7

    What happened to this issue? What was the outcome?

    I would now say since 2016 would not a DMX using APOM Lateral flexion be the way to see Alar integrity?
    Even I made the DMX place let me lie down over a fulcrum and I can see what looks like a partial dislocation as when I relax and tense my neck muscles – it clunks. I Pain.
    Unless it’s the Capsule Ligament on one side?

    No Doctor really helps me.

    AvatarDonald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 6759

    The alar ligament is really a secondary ligament connecting the top of the dens of C2 with the sides of the foramen magnum. To disrupt this ligament, you would also have to injure the occiput-C1 capsules and the ALL and PLL which would render the head unstable on the neck. I am not a fan of DMX to diagnose these disorders as there have been no studies to indicate instability numbers when watching these videos.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
Viewing 6 posts - 19 through 24 (of 24 total)

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