Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 13 total)
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  • Missie
    Participant
    Post count: 12

    Hi Dr

    I started of my incomplete sci life walking with a broad based gait.

    I could walk with flat feet yet kept falling over them. Sidewards. If this makes sense?

    As time passed and spasticity increased. I needed to put my legs in rigid spasm to make them move.

    These falls resulted in further of my spinal cord to be injured.

    My legs started to cross over a lot. Without me controling them to do this at all.

    Now I can only walk on my tip toes. My legs cross over. Whilst I do this. I decided to wear heels. To both protect my feet somehow plus they pull in my tummy like I’m unable to when I could walk on flat feet.

    I saw your article the other day. About how our gait changes. Just before this my neuro physio said I have scissor gait that’s often seen in cerebral palsy yet not sci.

    My specialists have all seen me in heels and tell me no don’t do it. Yet it’s this or I don’t walk or risk myself getting my feet hurt (I can’t feel them). I can only do a few steps. Not all the time and not on demand. As my legs don’t do nothing automatically anymore.

    Over here in the UK. There isn’t any help really for thoracic spine. As it’s said to be too rare. So wonder if you have any advice you can offer.

    I hate walking. I look like people who are very drunk. I also have prejudice from others who don’t know me who presume there’s nothing wrong as they see me in heels in my wheelchair. Without heels in my chair sitting up is even more horrendous. My heels help me tummy be pulled in to that I can’t do myself.

    Any insights as to why I walk this way. Would really help me understand.

    Thank you Dr.

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8459

    The first need is a diagnosis. This is a spinal cord or brain injury and the source needs to be determined, whether it is multiple sclerosis, myelopathy, a brain injury or a stroke. Is the disorder progressive, static or ???

    The “scissors gait” is due to an imbalance of muscles with some spastic and some weak. Your gait needs to be analyzed by an expert so that something possibly might be done to help balance your gait after the diagnosis is complete.

    Dr. Corenman

    Missie
    Participant
    Post count: 12

    Thank you Dr

    T6 spinal cord injury (incomplete) is due to the theca being flattened by disc prolapses and stenosis onto the spinal cord.

    I wrote to you before and you explained about an injection I could perhaps try. This worked wonderful. Thank you so much for your advice.

    My spinal cord was only affected on the left side initially. Over time the theca has flattened the anterior part of the cord too from what I’m aware from my scan.

    Now I understand more – that it is spasticity and weak muscles (I have lots of wastage) I feel more informed and less scared. I’ll keep you updated. Thank you ever so much for your time :-)

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8459

    If you have a disc prolapse or stenosis with this spastic gait, you need a decompression of the spinal cord (with a fusion normally). I hope that has been proposed.

    Dr. Corenman

    Missie
    Participant
    Post count: 12

    Hi Dr,

    I had surgery years ago. A multi disciplinary team of Consultants said no surgery will help again.

    I’m 12 years post accident and 10 years post surgery (classed as neglectful surgery – I chose not to take legal action as was a medical secretary and understand mistakes can happen).

    The cords been compressed for a very long time. I’m at peace with this now.

    If I can keep this function I have although it’s a little. I’ll be grateful for this ????

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8459

    Is your canal decompressed since surgery or do you have residual compression based upon a post-operative MRI?

    Can I assume that your gait disturbance is not progressive?

    If not progressive and your gait is abnormal but stable, you might find that there can be some surgeries that can make walking easier. For example, if your spasticity causes you to walk on your tiptoes, a lengthening procedure of your achilles tendon can be helpful. If there are muscles that are hypertonic (for example the adductors), Botox can be injected to relax these. You would have to find a real expert in gait disturbance to help you. I suggest starting first with Shriner’s hospitals as your gait is similar to cerebral palsy and those individuals have great experience with tendon releases for that disorder.

    Dr. Corenman

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