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  • phanos
    Member
    Post count: 6

    Hello everybody. I came I to this forum after watching some videos of Dr. Corenman (very nice work by the way). The reason was because I was trying to understand my MRI scan of my back.

    Six weeks ago I begun having pain at my right leg, starting from the back on the leg and going down almost to my angle. At the start I did not realize that it was something serious (I through it was muscle pain from the gym), so I keep going on my daily routine (going to work, gym etc). After two weeks and since the pain was not going away, I consulted a orthopedic doctor and he mention that the problem was that one my back discs has been swallowed and caused an inflammation that was interfering with the nerve that goes down my leg. He subscribed physiotherapy, medication (arcoxia, B complex vitamins and perskindol gel) and a lot of rest which i tried to follow to the letter.

    The good news was that after a couple of days the pain started to go away and I was feeling much better. By although the pain stared to diminished the first few days I continue having some pain on the back of my leg in the upper side. The pain continue for almost a month and finally the doctor sent me to have an MRI scan.

    Today I got my MRI scan and although I do not have the report yet only a copy (the report is due to come in a couple of days) I am trying to understand it. The reason for this is because three days ago the original pain has returned and I am getting worried. I do not understand why it did, I do not believe I did anything that might have cause it. After watching Dr. Corenman videos I do not believe that there is something really serious about my back but of course I am not a doctor. Is there a way that someone can give an idea about what is it that I am facing here? Is it really serious or is it something that will eventually go way? Will I ever return to my daily routine as before?

    Thank you very much about your time,

    Phanos

    SpinelessWench
    Member
    Post count: 38

    Since you’re asking no one in particular to address your question, I’ll add an observation. You’ve had an MRI scan, yet don’t have a dictated report of the radiologist’s impressions and primary interpretation of your images. You also haven’t had a follow-up appointment with your orthopedist to discuss the results, which may or may not coincide with your symptoms upon initial presentation to his office. It’s unlikely anyone here, or elsewhere, can begin to offer any explanation for why you’re experiencing intermittent back discomfort and leg pain. Here’s why…

    The primary reason for the lack of responses to your question is that you’ve only provided your subjective, personal description of the pain (which could be muscle spasms, a herniated disk, nerve root compression, minor arthritis, a misguided rocket, a cyst impinging on a nerve, inflammation, or any number of countless possibilities). You mentioned your physician’s suggestion that this is possibly related to something “swallowing your disks” and causing episodes of irritation to the nerves. It’s unclear what you mean with regard to “swallowing”, but perhaps you misheard what he was referring to. To my knowledge, there’s not a back condition involving the swallowing of anything, so this is a case of mistranslation during your conversation with the doctor. Next, you stated that at first, “you didn’t realize it was something serious.” There’s no way of concluding this is anything serious, because you have no test results to confirm that. Back pain has been deemed the #1 chief complaint by patients seeking initial treatment by orthopedic specialists, and the #1 pain-related reason people use when they “call in sick” to work. In fact, recent research indicates that back pain costs our healthcare system billions each year, and is unfortunately one of the most commonly “faked” injuries in order to obtain narcotic pain medication. The causes of back pain are still not completely understood within the medical community, so many patients never know the exact cause of why their back hurts.

    The majority of back pain cases do not result in paralysis, disability, life-long bouts with severe pain, the need to take drugs forever, or even significant future flare-ups. Plus, back pain doesn’t always equate with “serious.” Believe me, a stubborn or awkwardly located muscle strain, spasms, and inflammation from excessive or strenuous activity can hurt worse than back pain from a disk issue or nerve compression. A good example is a nasty high ankle sprain, which is probably a somewhat common injury seen in emergency rooms close in proximity to Dr. Corenman’s location (Vail). Beginners will set the boot binding too tightly, then when they fall, the boot doesn’t separate from the ski. These ankle injuries can hurt 500 times worse than a fracture, and most people will tell you they would’ve preferred their foot to break off. So again, pain doesn’t translate to serious.

    You begin to conclude your post by indicating you have no idea why your back hurts, but that you’re sure you did nothing to cause this pain. Again, it’s not uncommon to experience back pain, and many times, there’s no memorable event that you can connect to it. In other words, back pain isn’t always the result of a fall down a mountain, a car wreck, being hit by an asteroid, or being smashed into the ground while playing football. Pain anywhere in your body can occur from the most subtle, unnoticeable reasons — every year, people strain their backs and suffer from inflammation due to an exceptionally powerful sneeze or cough, two of the most kinetically-violent forces produced in the body. Seven years ago, I woke up one morning to severe elbow pain — imaging revealed a 60% complete tear of the tendon from the epicondyle. To this day, I have no clue how I managed to do that, and my surgeon who repaired it had no answer either.

    There’s no possible way anyone here can tell you, “what you’re facing”, “what the problem is”, whether it’s “serious”, whether it’ll “go away”, or if your “daily routine” will return to normal. And, while Dr. Corenman’s videos rank right up there with those action-packed Dirty Harry classics, simply watching these videos won’t lead to the reason behind why your back and leg hurt. Nor can you watch these brief videos and exclude every possible cause for your back problem just because your pain doesn’t match the pattern of pain associated with back problem “X” in Video #4.

    Again, it’s impossible for anyone to answer what you’re asking unless you have something to actually interpret.

    phanos
    Member
    Post count: 6

    Dear SpinelessWench thank you for the length explanation it is very helpful. I have booked an appointment today with my doctor to see the (copy) MRI scan. I will also booked another appointment to see him when the report becomes available.

    I will return to this forum when I have more info. Thank you very much for your time.

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8455

    Thanks SpinelessWench. That description is helpful.

    The causes of leg pain are myriad but most commonly, leg pain is generated by a compressed nerve in the lower back. This can be the result of a disc herniation in the posterolateral position (the most common location for a disc herniation). This disorder will cause increased pain while sitting and somewhat relieved with standing.

    Foraminal stenosis can also cause leg pain, worse with standing and improved with sitting. Foraminal stenosis can be caused by a disc herniation, a collapse of the disc height or by a bone spur.

    Let us know what the MRI report indicates.

    Dr. Corenman

    phanos
    Member
    Post count: 6

    Dr. Corenman thank you very much for your response. I have just came home from the meeting with my doctor in which he had a view of my MRI SCAN. According to him my lower disc (I think it was L5) has lost most of it liquid and this causes a lot of stress om my back and nerves. He prescribed physiotherapy and rest.

    I just want to know how bad my situation really is and if there is something that I can do. In order to get a better understanding of my problem is it possible to sent you a screenshot of my MRI scan to see?

    Thanks

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8455

    Most spine disorders are very painful but not dangerous. A significant degenerative disc at L5-S1 is not uncommon. If you also have leg pain from this disc collapse, you either have foraminal stenosis, lateral recess stenosis or a disc herniation (see website for those descriptions).

    You can if you wish send the CD/DVD of your MRI images to the office. Screen shots are incomplete and can be misleading. Call the office at (970) 476-1100 for further instructions if you so desire.

    Dr. Corenman

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