Viewing 3 posts - 1 through 3 (of 3 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • andys
    Member
    Post count: 2

    Dr Corenman,
    Thanks you for your expert advice and time devoted to this forum. I have a family member who underwent surgery to remedy her cervical spinal stenosis about 4-months ago. She has recovered mobility after having required a walker one month prior to the surgery. The problem is that she suffers numbness in her fingertips, and is prone to dropping things presumably via a loss of fine motor skills. Her doctor tells her that she needs to be patient that it may take 8 to 12-months to recover. She is depressed and worried that this condition might be permanent.

    Question: Do you have any statistics on comparable recoveries that might allay her concerns?

    Thank You!

    Donald Corenman, MD, DC
    Moderator
    Post count: 8371

    Cervical stenosis that causes cord compression produces spinal cord dysfunction and the symptoms of myelopathy. The spinal cord is not just “a long nerve” but in reality an extension of the lower part of the brain. Damage to the cord is similar to damage to the brain. This is why decompression of the cord is important prior to the onset of significant myelopathy. Surgery is designed to prevent further damage and recovery from cord injury will not be known for a year.

    The cord has functions that involve coordination of the muscles. Your sister recovered her walking ability which is wonderful but she was left with residuals of hand incoordination. Full recovery is not guaranteed. Hard work and relearning through tracts that are undamaged is important. There is no way to know what the final outcome will be.

    Dr. Corenman

    PLEASE REMEMBER, THIS FORUM IS MEANT TO PROVIDE GENERAL INFORMATION ON SPINE ANATOMY, CONDITIONS AND TREATMENTS. TO GET AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS, YOU MUST VISIT A QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL IN PERSON.
     
    Donald Corenman, MD, DC is a highly-regarded spine surgeon, considered an expert in the area of neck and back pain. Trained as both a Medical Doctor and Doctor of Chiropractic, Dr. Corenman earned academic appointments as Clinical Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, and his research on spine surgery and rehabilitation has resulted in the publication of multiple peer-reviewed articles and two books.
    andys
    Member
    Post count: 2

    Dr Corenman,
    Thank you for your quick reply. We will work with her to pursue available physical therapy options and to be patient during the recovery.

Viewing 3 posts - 1 through 3 (of 3 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.